r/AskReddit Sep 24 '22 Helpful 1

What’s the scariest rural place in the USA/Canada for your car to break down?

1.1k Upvotes

926

u/cosmolegato Sep 24 '22

Wyoming. It's a really cool place, but there's just nothing there...you might as well break down on another planet when it comes to some stretches on the interstate, let alone smaller roads.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

[deleted]

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u/mcloofus Sep 25 '22

Spent a summer working at a lodge in Glacier NP in Montana. A diabetic guest went into shock and we had to call 911. Closest EMTs were like 50 mi away. (He ended up being fine.)

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u/peaceintheatlantic Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

I'm a foreigner with a strange fascination with Wyoming. I'll be watching this today.

Edit: great, great movie. Apparently it wasn't recorded at Wyoming though. Even then, the feeling of desolation conveyed by those frozen, barren lands is very much real.

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u/ghostfaceinspace Sep 25 '22

One of my all time faves but that movie was filmed in Colorado 😭

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u/noworries_13 Sep 25 '22

Utah but yeah

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u/leviolentfemme Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

YUP.

Drove through Wyoming on two separate road trips up to see a friend in Idaho. It is so vast and desolate it’s haunting.

I remember the first time through, I looked over at my friend and said this is the perfect place to bury a body.

It was a tense few minutes before we both burst out in hysterical laughter. Also, best pizza I’ve ever had in my life was a tiny joint in Rawlins.

EDIT oh boy, I see the pizza uproar. I THINK it was named Shogun. Couldn’t find it on map so it may be closed now. I uploaded some pics from the trip, the first one was taken in the restaurant https://imgur.com/a/NBNF1i0

The others are to show how immensely vast and beautiful the landscape is.

EDIT 2: I FOUND THE PIZZA PLACE!! FOUND IT! It was Shogunz Pizza in Rawlins! http://shogunzpizza.com/

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u/GoodElevation Sep 25 '22

Tell me about the pizza

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u/GabbaGhouls Sep 25 '22

I too would like to know about the pizza

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u/Few-Background2498 Sep 25 '22

I am the third who would like to know about this tiny pizza place

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u/leviolentfemme Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Oh damn. Came back to check my notifications and PIZZA WAS DESIRED. Ugh I want to say that the place was named Shogun.

We went in late 2017. The pizza was PERFECT. It’s hard to describe but it was MAGIC. The crust was crispy and flaky; the sauce was just the right amount of “saucy” and had the right herbs.

I tried to find it on maps but it looks like it’s gone. So I uploaded the pics taken from then, https://imgur.com/a/NBNF1i0

the first photo was taken in the restaurant, if that helps anyone find out the name

EDIT: I FOUND IT I FOUND IT! Shogunz pizza in Rawlins!! http://shogunzpizza.com/

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u/Miramarr Sep 24 '22

Come visit northern Alberta!

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u/kneightx Sep 25 '22

A number of years ago I drove along the Texas/Mexico border and went through a little border town on the US side. A buddy of mine was with me and as soon as we pulled into town, we both looked at each other and said, "what the fuck is wrong with this place?"

But...I was almost out of gas, so I stopped to fill up. Went inside to pay. Standing in line. 10 year old buying a candybar in front of me. I suddenly realize that the magazine stand in front of me is completely filled with...anime porn? I still don't know. They looked like comic books...but the cover of the one that I happened to be looking at was a pussy. A very artfully drawn anime pussy, but a pussy nonetheless. With a 10 year old standing in front of me buying a candybar.

Okay, this is weird, but whatever. Ten year old pays for their candybar and exits. Guy behind the counter says, "can you hang on for a moment?". Sure. Whatever.

I look at the counter. The magazine on the counter seems to be a special effects magazine of some kind. It's showcasing what appears to be a severed human head lying on the sand of a beach somewhere. Me (still not figuring this out somehow)..."huh, this is an interesting magazine...what's the back cover?" The back cover would appear to be a car interior with a dead body and a bunch of blood and...material...everywhere.

Oh. This is a magazine of crime scenes. Death porn. At the local gas station.

So we left. Pretty sure the next car found themselves in the middle of a Stephen King novel.

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u/The_Middler_is_Here Sep 25 '22

Hey, don't judge me for my informative murder porn!

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u/mandalyn93 Sep 25 '22

Sounds like a suburb of El Paso.

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1.0k

u/veggienuggets123 Sep 24 '22

My car broke down in rural Nunavut. I’m lucky I had my emergency kit on me. Nothing like sitting for three hours while it’s -40C and no heat

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u/Squeaky-Fox43 Sep 24 '22

Why were you in rural NU in the first place? Just curious.

754

u/veggienuggets123 Sep 24 '22

I’m a population ecologist! Part of my job is studying polar bears and other arctic animals. I live in Nunavut or Manitoba three months out of the year

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u/DognamedTurtle Sep 25 '22 Silver

Umm…having you ever tried just inviting them to YOUR place?

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u/Ripeoldmelon Sep 25 '22

This is the only logical answer. Convenient and cost effective.

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u/AUniquePerspective Sep 25 '22

Stop talking. They already think we live in igloos and drink maple syrup. Now you pipe up and announce there are people who count polar bears for a living. Come on cousin.

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u/Dyolf_Knip Sep 25 '22

They already think we live in igloos and drink maple syrup.

I didn't, but now I do.

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u/24-Hour-Hate Sep 26 '22

I feel like I need to apologize. I once told an American that we keep beavers as pets. Sorry. 😔

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u/Pentacostal-Haircut Sep 25 '22

You aren’t afraid of the polar bears? I’d be terrified.

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u/veggienuggets123 Sep 25 '22

I’m pretty far away and I also carry a gun for emergencies

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u/One_Command1249 Sep 25 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Smart man. That way you can always shoot yourself if things get too rough.

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u/Teddy_Icewater Sep 25 '22

Or just shoot your partner in the leg so you can run away faster!

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u/dod6666 Sep 25 '22

I used to study polar bears like you. But then I took a bullet to the knee.

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u/vicente8a Sep 25 '22

Against polar bear? My favorite gun against them is a light 22 as small as possible. So it hurts less when the bear gets pissed I shot at it and he shoves the gun up my ass.

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u/xDANGRZONEx Sep 25 '22

Packin heat, huh? I guess that means if a polar bear zeroes in on you, you won't be having Nunavut 😀

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u/ProjectShadow316 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

That better be either a big gun or you're one hell of a shot.

EDIT: Stupid fingers.

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u/Squeaky-Fox43 Sep 24 '22

Sounds awesome.

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u/DisastrousWind7 Sep 25 '22

rural Nunavat

That's redundant

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u/Hypoallergenic_Robot Sep 25 '22

I was gonna say lmao. The most populated community in Nunavut is the capital, and Iqaluit still only has around 7,700 people. Not much urban happening up there.

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u/Gulbahar-00 Sep 25 '22

My school’s population is about half of Nunavut’s.

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u/Juutai Sep 25 '22

The more accurate moniker would be "on the land" rather than "in town".

Source: I'm just actually an Inuk.

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u/PalwaJoko Sep 25 '22

For me, it was west texas. No idea about the people, but it was unnerving. I drove through it at mid day-night. No cell phone signal. No radio. No power lines. Hot as hell. At night you could see occasional flashes of light in the distance of one of those fuel things that spit out fire out the top. Then every once in awhile there would be this random small house or run down looking trailer out in the middle a good 10-30 minute drive from the road. I always wonder what their story is. Cut off from the world in the middle of a desert, though I do not dare to find out lol.

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u/DetectiveLampshades Sep 25 '22

I was born in West TX, lived in a little town called Kermit. The haze from the oil always had sunsets and sunrises looking purple, and at night, by god it was so quiet out there. When the town was asleep, there were no crickets, no cars, no wind, just utter silence... and the A/C unit down the block. It was so remote, but man, if you ever got a flat tire, there was seriously like a 75% chance any given car would stop and help. My dad got flat tires all the time and we were never sitting for more than 20 minutes before someone stopped to help, even if he already got the spare on. 70 miles to the nearest hospital, 50 miles to the county courthouse... people knew they lived in the middle of nowhere and were really friendly because of it.

It's not really the same now. People don't stop anymore. Everyone thinks everyone is actively trying to kill them, and the desert isn't nearly as barren as it used to be. I think Kermit has about 5,000 people now, had less than 1,000 when I lived there

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u/The_Middler_is_Here Sep 25 '22

Just a few years ago we had to pull off the road in west Texas and someone tried to help within ten minutes. He was just a 20 something who wanted to help. I don't think that culture has gone away, there are just people now who talk louder.

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u/TheMeanGreenGoblin Sep 25 '22

You wouldn't recognize it anymore. I grew up in Midland. We moved 15 years ago. Now it's like I don't have a hometown to go back to anymore. It's almost unrecognizable. The place I grew up is pretty much gone. All the good people were priced out. The only ones left are oilfield workers.

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u/DetectiveLampshades Sep 25 '22

Yep I went back in April this year for the first time since maybe 2003, and Midland/Odessa have just exploded. I guess too many people got the idea to live in the desolate wasteland and ruined it. I was in shock how many people have decided to live in Kermit of all places, I honestly thought it was pretty miserable as a kid. But what else is new, there's so many people everywhere now

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u/terminally_cool Sep 25 '22

Raise your family in Midland, raise hell in Odessa

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u/big_sugi Sep 25 '22

If you’re not white, Vidor is the most notorious town in the state.

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u/terminally_cool Sep 25 '22

Kermit sand dunes are so much fun to go atv riding, until it gets dark and you realize you are out in the middle of nowhere. Happened to me and my bro in law, had to follow the North Star until we saw headlights from the highway.

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u/ChapelSteps Sep 25 '22

Grew up near West Texas and have driven through there a lot. Very friendly people willing to stop and help you out on the highway. My aunt’s car broke down once, and I remember people stopping to fix the car. I drank lemonade and played with the people’s kids while they worked on the vehicle.

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u/bentnotbroken96 Sep 25 '22

We were in west Texas halfway between Abilene and El Paso when the car started to misfire and the check engine light came on. Wife was driving, asked if she should pull over.

I was a bit stressed and simply said "no".

The third time she asked I said "look, if we pull over and the car won't restart, were HOURS away from everything. We go until the car won't anymore."

We made it to El Paso and got a hotel with the intention of going to a mechanic before we continued our trip... But after gassing up in the morning the car was running fine. Turned out to be a tank of bad gas.

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u/Felwinter12 Sep 25 '22

Having lived in Washington or southern Alaska for most of my life, forest-y areas are mostly fine, flat open ares bug me right tf out though. I hated being Texas for this reason, it's so unnerving if you get away from the more populous areas.

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u/Nut_buttsicle Sep 25 '22

West may be desolate, but as a lifelong Texan I’d say East is worse. Parts of East Texas are seriously backwoods.

I remember stopping somewhere in East Texas to use the restroom on a road trip years ago, and as soon as I got in the door, all the lively conversation froze into dead silence. All eyes were locked on me—it felt like I was in the first act of a horror movie where things start to turn.

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u/onesadjam Sep 24 '22 Gold Narwhal Salute

There are two kinds of scary rural: rural so remote you'll die before you reach help and rural where you die because you meet "help".

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u/Squeaky-Fox43 Sep 25 '22

I’m looking for die because you meet help.

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u/eclectic-worlds Sep 25 '22

Oh man, as a native Alabamian I gotta say Cullman County AL for this

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u/CTeam19 Sep 25 '22

Man that county just looking at a map looks to be a county my Grandpa(a Yankee, banker, Republican, with a funny-ish white last name aka a Dutch one) talked about specifically avoiding when going south in the 1950s and 1960s.

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u/Torq_Magebane Sep 25 '22

Dude, the name alone... Cullman.... Cull Man

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u/Whole-Patience Sep 25 '22

Yes. I’m from Huntsville, I second this.

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u/Big_Ad_2633 Sep 25 '22

LA.....Lower Alabama here

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u/hawkdaslayer Sep 25 '22

Once I went into a rural gas station in Alabama (somewhere near Sipsy) and asked if they knew.who was winning the NASCAR race and they didn't know what I was talking about.

I'm dead serious.

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u/Viciousharp Sep 25 '22

Some of those areas near Sipsey are wild. So incredibly rural. We like to drive up from Birmingham and hike around Bankhead and Sispey. Always have plenty of gear, a rifle, and a good knife/hatchet. Getting stuck up there would be super scary.

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u/Oddant1 Sep 25 '22

Like. Literally didn't know what NASCAR was? Had never heard of it?

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u/hawkdaslayer Sep 25 '22

Perhaps I should've said "Stock Car Racing" as they were a bit older.

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u/Oddant1 Sep 25 '22

Man I used to run liquor away from the cops. These boys don't know shit about driving

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u/hawkdaslayer Sep 25 '22

I'm old and growing up in the mountains of NC we had a family friend who worked for the Treasury Department during prohibition. He had been shot in the ass as a young man busting stills. He showed me all the pictures one day when I was in my early teens. He said the hardest part about it was everyone was dirt poor, mostly doing it for the money, and he almost always personally knew the people they were going to bust.

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u/BamaBachFan Sep 25 '22

Definitely Cullman.

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u/MyTribalChief Sep 25 '22

Ask a non American, can I ask why? What's wrong?

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u/onesadjam Sep 25 '22

So Deliverance rural. I'd say rural West Virginia down some forgotten windy road in Appalachia where no one is going to come looking for you except the folks who tracked you and found you.

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u/Squeaky-Fox43 Sep 25 '22

As an Appalachian, this makes sense. The stories my dad could tell about “Hillbilly Crackville,” where there’s no one to hear you scream besides T H E M.

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u/KittenPurrs Sep 25 '22

90s stand-up jokes: A gangsta will kill you, but a hillbilly will keep you.

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u/Guac__is__extra__ Sep 25 '22

Yep…my first thought on this question was the hollers of Kentucky and West Virginia.

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u/Smokedawge Sep 25 '22

After living in northern West Virginia and talking to people from Pennsylvania, they have no concept of how rough the southern area of the state is. That girl will out work you in any rough job, she won’t back down in a fight. Are you ready for you balls to get grabbed and twisted around? Cause that’s what she is gonna do.

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u/gummo_for_prez Sep 25 '22

I’m from Pittsburgh and you’re right. We don’t really go down that way…

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u/Bigfops Sep 25 '22

Based on the friends I know who broke down there, Accident, MD.

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u/vikumwijekoon97 Sep 25 '22

Highway of tears in Canada.

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u/Hawkwise83 Sep 25 '22

I'd say between Thunder bay and Winnipeg. There's like fuck all between these two places, and I once saw a giant white wolf here. Was cool, but I wouldn't want to break down there.

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u/3skwrrlsinagirlsuit Sep 25 '22

Driving from Ontario to BC with a friend we drove through that part at night. In a part with no cell reception we passed a dude walking along the road and thought it was pretty messed to be walking a stretch of road with nothing around at zero dark stupid in November so we turned around after about 5 minute to offer a ride and we couldn't find him. No other cars passed us. Creepiest feeling I've ever had.

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u/TillElectronic8376 Sep 25 '22

Not as creepy when you consider this: that was a ghost who was probably gonna murder you but it realized you were going to give it a ride and it was like “nvm this person chill lol I’ll come back later”

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22

Driving through the dessert in the US. When they say last gas 200 miles, they mean it. If you broke down along one of those stretches, man, that might not work out so good.

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u/ClemofNazareth Sep 25 '22

The road that goes through Amboy, California. Not sure if the stories are true but either way it’s creepy as hell.

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u/spacegodcoasttocoast Sep 25 '22

Amboy's one of the darkest areas at night in Southern California - absolutely beautiful on a clear, new moon night. Bring friends!

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u/radelix Sep 25 '22

I fucking love it out there at night. The desert at night is something amazing

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u/Chad_Hooper Sep 25 '22

That just makes Amboy sound even creepier than it looks.

Even in broad daylight that place is bad vibes. Won’t go through there again if I can help it. Plan on being armed if I have to go back.

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u/BigChonkyPP Sep 25 '22

All in perspective. I find your typical "creepy" rural places much less scary. Humans dont go there. Humans are dangerous. Also its quiet. You can hear anything big from a mile away. Compared to a city where someone can shoot you while a train goes by and no one will hear it.

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u/dbcbabe Sep 25 '22

Can you elaborate? I drive around Cali quite a bit and I like to stay updated in places to avoid

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u/bridgetroll2 Sep 25 '22

There's literally nothing to fear out there besides car trouble, it's just vast empty desert and very few people. Not very scary.

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u/SuperdaveOZY Sep 25 '22

Funny how in these modern times, The Wild West still lingers on.

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u/11181514 Sep 25 '22

I drove through there earlier this year on a cross country trip. I didn't think it was particularly creepy other than the lion statues just like out in the middle of the desert. But considering that was the last leg of my 66 trip that wasn't anything surprising by that point. The scariest part was seeing the gas prices at Roy's. I figured it was just weirdly high due to the location and novelty, but imagine my surprise when I got back into "civilization" and the gas was MORE expensive!

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u/potato_lindy Sep 25 '22

I live on a military base about an hour from amboy. The stories I’ve heard from some marines who’ve been here for a long time and even some people who happen to go through there regularly are wild. When my brother helped me move out here and we drove through there I wasn’t aware of the stories but there was definitely something going on thag night. My brother and I were both freaked tf out and even more so after hearing stories about it

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u/ClemofNazareth Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

The base he’s talking about is at 29 Palms, I was also stationed there years ago. Heard wild stories about mutated animals that resulted from nuclear waste buried at 29 Palms and China Lakes (another military base near there). Also heard people had disappeared in and around Amboy over the years and nobody knew exactly why. There were rumors of devil worshippers and cannibals, sort of The Hills Have Eyes stuff. I’ve heard there is nuclear waste buried in both those bases, not bombs or anything but more like byproducts from handling waste such as gloves, paint, stuff like that.

It’s a creepy place, or at least was when I lived out there. There were jojoba farms covered in lime or something like that which gave them a ghostly appearance. The ‘town’ is basically an abandoned gas station and tiny beat-up roadside motel that is painted all white. Went through there many times in the 80s and early 90s on our way to Laughlin, Nevada. We always saw a lot of critters on the road (frogs mostly) for no apparent reason. Car broke down once near there with my then girlfriend (now wife) and I hoofed out for help. A little while later a cop car came flying up the road with his lights and siren on to pick me up. He had her in the car and told me pretty sternly to never leave anyone out there alone.

Not sure what if anything is true about that place but it definitely had a very weird vibe.

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u/NoUnderstanding4193 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

What are the stories?

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u/purpleblackgreen Sep 25 '22

Right? You can't just tell us about these intriguing stories and then NOT tell us the stories!!

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u/TheInuitHunter Sep 25 '22

Y'all got any more of them stories?

We're here for the chill.

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u/DFWTBaldies Sep 25 '22

Hit us with those stories.

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u/ProjectShadow316 Sep 25 '22

Stories? Go on...

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Fun fact about Amboy: As of 2020, the town's business district still contained a post office, a historic restaurant-motel, and a Route 66 tourist shop, all operated by the town's population of four people.

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u/sickndelish Sep 25 '22

Especially rocky road

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u/Dmgreening Sep 25 '22

Flat Tire-amisu

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u/SuperZoomBattle2086 Sep 25 '22

Lost Keys Lime Pie

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u/bitchchips Sep 25 '22

Al.ost happened to me when I was 16 and went with my family to death valley. It was a stupid idea in the first place. It was 124 degrees, and the tires started melting, and the car started malfunctioning. Thank God we made it out before the car broke down, but it's so easy to get stuck there.

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u/Zytharros Sep 24 '22

I imagine along the Saskatchewan-Northwest Territories border in the dead of winter would be pretty horrifying.

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u/DeliciousPangolin Sep 25 '22

Most of the roads in the far north are busier than you'd think, because the amount of maintenance they need to stay passable means they only get built if there's a real need for them. And they'd be impassable past September without regular plowing.

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u/techackz Sep 25 '22

Lol southern Saskatchewan is scary enough as it is in the winter

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u/More-Masterpiece-561 Sep 25 '22

My uncle was a student of U of Saskatchewan during the 90s. He said that you could spit and it would turn into ice before hitting the ground during the winters. It was painfully cold. Wouldn't want to have your car break down in that cold.

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u/Miramarr Sep 24 '22

Not many roads up there though unless you fly in.

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u/Zytharros Sep 25 '22

Doesn’t mean there aren’t crazy people who try anyway.

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u/fathersophie Sep 25 '22

driving anywhere on a desert highway with no nearby urbanism

my aunt was driving with her cousin and aunt in rural arizona once at night, and they had to stop the car because three figures in black and green clothing and hoods on were crossing the road sideways, facing their car. i remember staying at my uncles house during the time of their day trip and them coming back absolutely petrified

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u/little_brown_bat Sep 25 '22

Especially when there's a shimmering light up ahead in the distance.

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u/fathersophie Sep 25 '22

and when ur head gets heavy and ur sight gets dim

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u/Bulky_Ad_3608 Sep 25 '22

About 30 years ago, wife and I stopped to pee in the parking lot of an abandoned restaurant in the middle of the night in the Pine Barrens. I don’t know if scary is the correct word. Definitely creepy.

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u/spookyghost42069 Sep 25 '22

As someone who spent their early 20s (10+ years ago) driving around the Pine Barrens at night seeking “spooky” things, I can confirm scary/creepy are definitely the words sometimes lol

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u/Metallurgist-831 Sep 25 '22

One time down there I saw this Czech dude with a bullet hole in his head running from these two Italian dudes.

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u/xSlappy- Sep 25 '22

Yeah I heard about him, heard he was an interior decorator

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u/CausticThoughts Sep 25 '22

His house looked like shit.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

I have driven through Nevada before and 99.9% of it is just empty desert with nothing for a hundred miles except for a high security prison, so if you get stranded thirst would be the most likely to kill you, there aren't even cacti.

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u/EzraMeeker53 Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

Death Valley at noon. It is was 130°F there recently.

Edit: actually happened to me while driving a 1977 dodge conversion camper RV in 2001. Engine over heated on a 108°F day. Had to pull over for an hour and let it cool down then drove 25 mph to the next little gas station where we could get coolant. That was a pretty scary moment.

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u/Xboxben Sep 25 '22

Death Valley at night too… fuck being alone out there at night! Scariest drive of my life

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u/EzraMeeker53 Sep 25 '22

That was one of my biggest fears. Nobody was pulling over to help out a couple of 25 year old dudes with an old van/RV at noon. You might survive the heat but god only knows who’s driving that desolate stretch of highway at night.

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u/Contamminated Sep 25 '22

Outside a pig farm 🐖.

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u/blackjesus21 Sep 25 '22

I drove an old truck (just rebuilt to transmission) from Fairbanks to the lower 48 back in early April of this year. I brought four bins of parts, oils, and tools with me because I was absolutely terrified of breaking down. There are parts of the upper Yukon that are HOURS away from the nearest gas station, let alone the nearest hospital. It was also -10F when I started and I had my contingency sack with cold-weather gear readily available. I also brought a -30F sleep sack and a propane heater. I tried to prepare for a breakdown as much as possible but I knew that if I were to wreck I would most likely die. If I slid off the road or I hit a moose I would die. I couldn’t count on anyone to be there to rescue me or perform life-saving aid but myself. So I would agree with an earlier comment in the fact that some parts are so desolate you have no hope of survival other than yourself. You can plan for it as much as you’d like but when it’s out of your hands you’re essentially leaving it up to luck.

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u/Cool-Dad-69 Sep 25 '22

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u/rowdydionisian Sep 25 '22

I'd rather walk back on the road after reading who makes their beds there...it sounds like The Hills Have Eyes + KKK + guns + Meth + crazy religious zealots...+ Being connected to Timothy McVeigh. Good job, you have picked the actual worst place in possibly the whole USA to break down.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

Woah, fuckin yikes 😳

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u/asmosdeus Sep 25 '22

I’m willing to bet that fucking weirdness is related to other weird shit mentioned in Oklahoma

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u/dared3vil0 Sep 25 '22

Northern BC (Canada) back country. Can be on a logging road within 100 miles of a town (what passes for a town anyway... Read: 500 people, a grocery store, and 2 gas stations.) and you might not have anyone come by for years...

About a month ago I rode a trail that I had last rode 2 summers ago, and went from a reasonably nice trail to completely overgrown. I doubt it had seen anyone since I had been down. Maybe a hunter or two. Maybe.

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u/pinuslaughus Sep 25 '22

Alberta oilfield road in the mountains at break up when no one might be around for two months.

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u/ezzysalazar Sep 25 '22

There are stretches of desert in California where there is absolutely nothing for miles and miles.

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u/Frankfusion Sep 25 '22

Those parts of central California like that as well off the 5 freeway. Rented at least there's tons of people driving up and down the freeway but still some of those places are nothing but Open Fields that go on for hundreds of miles.

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u/flytingnotfighting Sep 25 '22

Rural southeast Oklahoma

I’ve lived in some places, but the experience of meth users on the Arkansas/Oklahoma border in the middle of no where? That was fucking terrifying. I witnessed a man in overalls, no shirt, DIVE out of a ditch on the side of the road, ROLL across the gravel road, into the other ditch, and then just STARE at me while I waited. There was an entire family that just disappeared. Like man, woman, child, dog…gone Into a rural area and not uninhabited or super wild…just rural

No thank you. I’ve seen wrong turn and Texas chainsaw…I’m good

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u/danceswithanxiety Sep 25 '22 edited Oct 19 '22

I came here to nominate the southeastern corner of Oklahoma. My granny lived near Idabel and managed to be a well-known and reasonably well-liked person in McCurtain County, but there was a menace to those people you could feel when she wasn’t around. And this was back in the 1980s before meth and opiates took over.

Oh, and if you get run off the road or die mysteriously there, which you probably will, no police work will be done.

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u/fuckondeeeeeeeeznuts Sep 25 '22

I just looked and you're not kidding. So far away from the nearest interstate and can't find two cities that it sits in between. Even on a scenic route cross country drive I can't think of any reason to be in southeast OK.

Even the hypothetical drive between Shreveport and Tulsa has me going further west of that southeast corner of OK for the fastest route. Remind me not to take the scenic route if I ever have to make that drive.

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u/bluestocking220 Sep 25 '22

Agreed. The Ouachita National Forest is really disorienting, it’s the only place where I’ve literally walked in circles because I couldn’t see anything but trees. Cell service is spotty at best.

After a construction detour, we attempted a backroad between Broken Bow and Robber’s Cave but noped right out of there after about a quarter mile. Sketchy AF.

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u/saveyboy Sep 25 '22

The stretch between Sault Ste. Marie and Thunder Bay is pretty deserted.

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u/P00NLagoon97 Sep 25 '22

Dempster highway, in Canada is by far the worst. It is the road that connects Whitehorse to Inuvik.

Its a gravel road that is 742km (461 miles) long, and stretches from the sub arctic to the arctic. Theirs only one or two villages that the highway runs through.

If the severe cold doesnt kill you in the winter, the wildlife certainly would. Youre also far from any phone towers. Very far.

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u/drygnfyre Sep 25 '22

I was gonna say the Dalton Highway. It's basically the same thing. They've got the same issues.

That said, for those interested in driving them, there are companies that will rent you cars equipped for the drive, including satellite phones and warm clothes. As long as you're prepared, these highways travel through some beautiful wilderness.

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u/copper8061 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

We were stationed in northern montana,10 miles from the Canadian border and a 40 mile trip to the nearest town. My car broke down on the dirt road 10 miles from our AFSite. I sat there,wondering what to do ( no cell phones then) when a truck came by,a man got out to help me. Turned out he was from my hometown in Ohio! I mean,what were the odds of that happening?? It was crazy.Broke down in 30 below 0 weather,same area,while pregnant. Got out and started walking to the only cattle barn I could see,I was bundled up in my husbands work coveralls that I found in the trunk. Thankfully a farmer drove by. These are sparsely traveled roads. I always considered it a miracle both times.

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u/ClemofNazareth Sep 25 '22

US 14 between Huron and Pierre South Dakota, especially in the winter. Dark, narrow two-lane road with mostly no highway divide, almost no towns or people and very few gas stations. Remember the highway scene in Fargo where the family in the station wagon drives by after the cop gets killed? It’s like that.

Also McDonald Pass in western Montana. Pretty much impassable in winter and often closed so if you break down there’s a good chance you’ll freeze out there. Used to be in Montana the highway department would put up a reflective cross wherever someone got killed on a road. Driving up that mountain pass and seeing those damn things will creep you out.

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u/NorthDakotaJohnson Sep 25 '22

All of South Dakota is very rural. There’s maybe one actual city (Sioux Falls) and a couple big towns (Aberdeen, Rapid City). The rest is just small towns with one gas station and a Dollar General.

This makes for very boring road trips to Minnesota.

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u/Cold_Refuse_7236 Sep 24 '22

Between U.S. 56 in New Mexico between Springer & Clayton. God-awfully desolate at night.

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u/Necessary-Success779 Sep 25 '22

Up around Farmington is way creepy

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u/the-cosmic-kraken Sep 25 '22

My dad used to live in a 'town' where only 66 people lived there all year long. If you didn't know where you were going you'd end up in the swamp. And with only 66 people the chances of anyone finding you in there were very fucking slim.

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u/KrayzieAlcohilicFlow Sep 24 '22

Highway of Tears

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u/Miramarr Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Op said for your car to break down. Not where the RCMP decide to throw you out of the cruiser.

Edit: I was thinking of starlight tours. Highway of tears is a stretch of highway through bc with a lot of unsolved murders of indigineous women and hitchhikers through the 80's and 90s I believe

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u/ghostsof1917 Sep 25 '22

Police called those the "starlight tours". They'd take Indigenous people to city outskirts mid-winter, kick them out of the car and make them walk back to town or freeze to death.

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u/spookytransexughost Sep 25 '22

Nope different terrible thing. Highway of years is a section of highway in bc where lots Of woman have gone missing, mostly First Nations

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u/-cordyceps Sep 25 '22

Oh, so a different horrible thing happening to indigenous populations...

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u/fordisabastard Sep 25 '22

Yep. And the govt claims they've fixed it by providing cell service along the entire highway, but as someone that lives on it...

There's still huge spots with no reception.

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u/Belasius Sep 25 '22

I used to be a dispatcher for AAA Roadside Assistance. There's a little series of islands/marsh in very southern Louisiana called Grand Isle (or Island, I forget). Whenever a call came in from someone down there, not only would it take us several hours to find a contractor willing to go help someone down there, but when we did, they would quote no less than 3 or 4 hours themselves.

So basically an all day wait for something as small as a flat tire or locking your keys in your car.

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u/platitood Sep 25 '22

Tourists have died in Death Valley. It's in the name, and yet. They do.

Beyond nature, I'm not sure. I think in the past, when marijuana was still illegal in California, there were plenty of no-go areas in the north woods. But you didn't need to break down to have life-threatening issues, just take the wrong road.

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u/Miramarr Sep 24 '22

Pretty much anywhere more than a 2 hour drive from a major city in January. A lot of people don't know it but having a winter survival kit in your car can easily save your life. There are a lot of rural roads with no cell cervice and little to no traffic, especially at night. Always have a way to keep yourself warm stowed in your car.

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u/acgasp Sep 25 '22

It’s not a long distance, but the Seney Stretch in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It is a perfectly straight stretch of 25 miles through a National Wildlife Refuge and there is NOTHING on the road between the unincorporated towns of Seney and Shingleton.

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u/charleychaplinman21 Sep 25 '22

I broke down in Youngstown, Ohio once. Got some serious Mad Max vibes from that place.

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u/Achrus Sep 25 '22

I stopped for gas in Youngstown once and it’s the creepiest place I’ve ever been, worse than south side Chicago or Detroit. Something just felt off about that place.

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u/Agile-Technician-832 Sep 25 '22

Not long after I moved to the US I found myself on a contract in Kosciusko Mississippi.

Second day in I went for a drive out along the Natchez Trace.

Took a few back roads and was out in the woods with no real idea where I was but with no real worries either.

I was driving along enjoying the fresh air and scenery when I noticed I was getting low on fuel but I had no idea where the closest gas station was.

So the needle was dropping while I searched, driving in the wrong direction for all I knew.

Decided I’d better get some directions but there were no houses around, only letterboxes on the occasional dirt road winding back into the woods but as the gauge dropped I decided I had better take one of them and follow it up to a house.

Bit nervous about this but what the hell, right.

So I turn off and start driving back up into the sticks.

Long driveway, maybe two miles long winds up this mountain and down into a valley eventually opening up into a clearing with this fucked up old shack.

Now here’s the thing about this story.

Everything (and I mean everything) was like it was right out of a script.

Right down to the junk yard dog.

I’m not even kidding.

Rusted tin roof, Car bodies, busted up old outhouse, the works.

Got out of my bird thinkin this was not the smartest move I had ever made and began walking up to the door.

Two steps.

Dog starts up pullin at the end of his chain

four step and the door opens a crack and a shot gun is levelled at my chest.

Have to admit I’m probably stammering at this point.

“G,G,G’day.

I’I’m an Aussie and I’m running out of fuel and need some directions m’mate.”

Lol.

Soon as he heard the the words G’day, Aussie and mate the door opens , shot gun lowers and this big old hillbilly is standing there in overalls and bare feet and giving me this big old toothless grin.

He puts the gun down and comes out, walks up to me (shouting at the dog to shut up) and puts an arm over my shoulder and begins animatedly guiding me to the porch muttering in an accent so thick I was only getting ever fourth word.

Turns out he had served closely with Aussies in Vietnam.

Ended up sitting me down on an old sofa on the porch and bringing out this filthy old clay jug and offering me a drink.

Fuck man.

I know why they call it rotgut.

We drank and talked and laughed around a fire in the yard most of the night.

I dont know what we had for dinner but Im pretty sure it was possum.

In the morning he gave me directions and enough gas to to get there.

I could never remember his first name (not sure I ever even caught it) but his last name was Brown.

Moonshine Brown has been my email address ever since. lol.

I went on to spend ten years working across the backwoods of the United States.

I’m just an outback plumber but I Love them good old boys.

If you’re real and just be yourself and dont try and bullshit them and they decide you’re ok they’l give you the shirt off their backs.

Then again I’m a working class country boy.

I’m also Australian and they tend to like that too because theres something of an extended brotherhood there.

Might be a bit different for you Euro city fellas rocking up unanounced in your Armani suits and BMW’s. Lol.

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u/-newlife Sep 25 '22

As a youngster it was outside of Roy’s cafe in Amboy, Ca. Does not help with all the stories/bs that I heard about Amboy when I was young.

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u/PopperShnoz Sep 24 '22

After driving across the US?

New Mexico...

Ain't shit out there but Wind Turbines...

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u/runrun950 Sep 25 '22

The most isolated I’ve ever felt was on the Alaska Highway, about a 100 miles east of the Al/Can border. I was praying I didn’t break down. In my mind the danger was from the animals I might make contact with, and the fact the weather can change from decent to brutal very fast. The fact I was riding my motorcycle from OH to Fairbanks made my super alert to my surroundings and everything that could go wrong.

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u/AsleepSoil7426 Sep 25 '22

You had me kind of rolling my eyes and then I read motorcycle and almost died

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u/g_hoop Sep 25 '22

My face immediately went 😯 as I read motorcycle

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u/Fuzzy_Effective_5849 Sep 25 '22

Drove the Alcan twice and it’s pretty scary to think about breaking down

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u/fuckondeeeeeeeeznuts Sep 25 '22

Pat McNamara has a story about walking into a weird ass voodoo ritual during his Delta Force training. So, wherever the fuck he was but you're not a super soldier commando like he was.

https://youtu.be/eanDCWHgTpk

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u/cambeiu Sep 25 '22

If you are a person of color, Mid-Michigan, like Gratiot or Isabella counties. That is deep into militia country and if you are not white, you do not want to be caught there.

I know the South gets a lot of shit, but Michigan, specially the rural parts, can give the deepest and most redneck parts of the South a run for its money in terms of bigotry and racism.

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u/capitalismwitch Sep 25 '22

Yup. My town in Minnesota is a former sundown town and still is in a lot of ways. People assume it’s all in the south, but the rural Midwest is just as bad if not worse.

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u/Alas_Babylonz Sep 25 '22

The Eastern San Luis valley in Colorado. Espiecially around Mount Bianca up to the Great Sand Dunes national monument. Creepy as fuck. Strange lights at night, numerous cattle mutilations, just high weirdness and feeling watched the whole time I was there. I wanted to climb up the Sand Dunes, but got there on a cold February middle of the night. Tried to sleep in the parking lot so I could climb up and take pictures of the sun rise on the Dunes. Felt creeped out in the pale light of the parking lot, all alone.

I found out about the stories about the mutilations and UFOs only after I visited and searched for why it felt so creepy.

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u/oles_lackey Sep 25 '22

Did you happen to hear/feel a constant low level humming sound from dusk to dawn? I rented a ranch hand cottage just south of the Sand Dunes for a few years. The dead quiet, the hum sound/vibrations, and the blood red sunrises gave it an odd vibe. Eventually, an Alamosa County deputy moved into one of the nearby cottages. One night, my friends and I had a fire pit going. We invited him to join us. Big mistake. He proceeded to tell us about the cows and sheep they’d found mutilated…high up in trees. He also told us about the non-stop UFO calls. Weirdest place I’ve ever lived.

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u/evan_roos456 Sep 25 '22

I would have to say Alaska, there is nothing for hours in some spots, the coldness, wolves, and bears

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u/NuclearWinterGames Sep 25 '22

I'd imagine the rural logging roads of northwestern Maine would not be an ideal place to be broken down

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u/More-Escape3704 Sep 25 '22

Centralia,Pennsylvania

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u/n0753w Sep 25 '22

In the deepest part of Alabama.

The Top Gear trio can tell you a thing or two.

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u/paholmes Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Downtown Edmonton.

No, I’m serious. 🫤

(Post edit: I just saw the “rural” part of the OP. Hey, in my defence, I hadn’t had my morning coffee…)

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u/zSadArtist Sep 25 '22

If you meant scary rural as in no help for miles, then the desert in Nebraska, I mean even when you see adds for phone coverage Nebraska always has the least amount of coverage. Barely anyone lives there it's just nothingness just the desert. There isn't a whole lot of water in the desert there either. You can't go more than 2 days or so without water and without help for miles you could easily die.

If you were looking for scary rural as in, you don't want to find help then Muskegon Heights in Michigan. I think it may have made on the list of worst places to live in the U.S., but I could be WRONG about that. It has some of the highest crime rates and lots of drug users. Michigan is shitty as it, but Muskegon Heights makes it shittier.

Both are scary and wouldn't want to break down in either one.

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u/llcucf80 Sep 25 '22

Trio of cities in Northeast Florida: Lake Butler, Starke, and Raiford. Those tri-towns are where the major state prisons (and execution chamber) is in Florida, and the bulk of their economy depends on the prison system and it reflects deeply in their culture. It's very racist, backwoods, and rednecky. It is a place you do not want to be if you're not from around there.

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u/toad__warrior Sep 25 '22

I have traveled a lot in Florida and agree. My wife and I never stop in these areas. It has an unwelcoming vibe.

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u/solsun Sep 25 '22

Harrison, AR. Surprised it wasn't listed already.

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u/mel_cache Sep 25 '22

Middle of nowhere Arizona-New Mexico-West Texas. There are some very empty, very desert-y places out there.

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u/Efficient_Ad6015 Sep 24 '22

Drove from StLouis to New Orleans and those tiny towns totally hidden by the thick landscape are creepy as hell. Just like a horror movie, it may look charming but hell no—never stop because of a simple novelty. Especially in a really densely wooded area. You may be on someone’s property without realizing and they will shoot you if you are on it.

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u/charleychaplinman21 Sep 25 '22

I’ve done that drive too. I know it’s clichéd to dunk on Mississippi, but damn…Mississippi is rough.

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u/bison--3 Sep 24 '22

If you're a POC, Missouri's bootheel

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u/PrestigeCitywide Sep 24 '22

I wouldn’t limit it to just the boot heel.

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u/bison--3 Sep 24 '22

Yeah, east STL would be a not so kind spot to get stuck.

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u/B_Sharp_or_B_Flat Sep 25 '22

East STL is Illinois but I got you

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u/A_R_K_S Sep 24 '22

Lol I’m half black & from Wardell, MO (population of 290) & I can say this is partially true. That said, there are also areas where if you’re white, you’re not in the “right” town; first one that comes to mind is Wynne, Arkansas, too many active crips for folks to mindlessly be driving through.

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u/IronworkRapunzel Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Reminds me of this comment I read from another thread where this guy on a road trip stopped into a diner and he had said all the patrons had looked at him funny. One of them (maybe was the owner?) told him he should leave unless he was looking for trouble.

OP was black and everyone else was white.

Edit: I think this was the comment: https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/uqmwkz/what_is_a_eerie_town_or_place_where_you_felt/i8s7ueq/

It was Brandywine, WV.

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u/terminator_chic Sep 25 '22

Generally I would say WV is a very safe place to break down and I'd think due to a few things Brandywine would see a bit more diversity, but there's always a bunch of old redneck dudes hanging out at the Sheetz there, and I can see this happening.

For the most part, if you break down in BFE WV you'll just have every person driving past stop to help you. Seriously, any time I've stopped to help people they let me know the tow truck is on its way and I'm like the fifth person to stop to help. Except the times I witnessed an accident, then I was there first.

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u/FattierBrisket Sep 25 '22

"if you break down in BFE WV you'll just have every person driving past stop to help you."

I was born and raised in WV and yes, this! Hell, I've been the person broken down and one of the ones stopping to help. Not usually on the same day.

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u/terminator_chic Sep 25 '22

It gets to be hilarious sometimes. We got a flat and the lug nuts had been tightened mechanically. A variety of guys pulled over and it was like a contest to see who had the strength and tools to help us out. I'm willing to bet that after that, each person present went out and had someone custom weld a heavy duty X shaped lug wrench with an extender bar like the one dude had. I know we did. The standard lug wrenches were bending from the force.

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u/FattierBrisket Sep 25 '22

Yes!! 😂 And the adorably collaborative effort to push somebody who's gotten stuck in the snow, where there's so many people that not all of them can actually even touch the car but damnit they're gonna try...! I love it.

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u/No_Willingness7837 Sep 25 '22

The only place I can think of is where I use to live for some time. It was next to a smallish town and next to the town was a small city ( maybe 15-20 minutes away from where I lived) therefore the road was an actual road not gravel. There were very little houses and the road was basically at least 3 miles of a skinny road with forests on each side. It was basically the most hillbilly redneck thing you could think of, all of the driveways were made of gravel or dirt and a good amount of houses had confederates flags. If your car broke down there you were screwed tbh, even I got scared sometimes coming home at night. If the cliche forest killer didn’t get you the coyotes and bears probably would, or the rednecks

Edit: it was Ethel Louisiana in case anyone was wondering, I honestly always got the creeps from that place

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u/Going_my_own_way73 Sep 25 '22

When I was moving from Florida to Colorado, I was driving I-10 across Texas. Pretty much anywhere in west Texas. There is a whole lot of nothing out there. Felt really creepy to me.

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u/lemonpepperlarry Sep 25 '22

In the US this answer changes quite a bit depending on whether or not youre black

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u/digfor_fire Sep 25 '22

There was an indigenous woman that was found one winter morning several miles south of a small rural town in our province. It appeared she’d been kicked out of the vehicle and left to freeze to death. That would be awful.

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u/RottingSextoy Sep 24 '22

Not me furiously scrolling to make sure my town isn’t on here