r/AskReddit Sep 25 '22 Silver 6

What is a true fact that sounds fake? NSFW

8.9k Upvotes

2.4k

u/SuvenPan Sep 25 '22 Helpful

Female dragonflies drop out the sky and pretend to be dead to avoid unwanted male advances.

321

u/intronert Sep 26 '22

Saw a documentary that showed how male dragonflies will catch the females in flight and whirl them around to expel the sperm of the male who previously mated with her, before they themselves mate.

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u/Lone_Wolf_888 Sep 25 '22

From 1912 to 1948, the Olympics awarded official medals for painting, sculpture, architecture, literature and music, alongside those for the athletic competitions.

694

u/AdventuresofRobbyP Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

“and Salvador Dali wins yet again, another gold medal for the Spaniards”

597

u/wizardinDminor Sep 26 '22

Damn, I kinda wanna watch some Olympic painting ngl

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9.4k

u/librician Sep 25 '22

The ancient Egyptian empire lasted more than 3000 years. It has been less time since the empire fell.

7.3k

u/Sufficient-Piece-335 Sep 25 '22 Today I Learned

The empire lasted so long, there were ancient Egyptian archaeologists studying (even more) ancient Egypt.

1.8k

u/Adler4290 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Not the same but when the first emperor of Rome, Octavian, became Augustus (both his title and ruler-name), he went to Alexandria to visit the Tomb of Alexander the Great (in 27 BC), the (for him) ancient, or at least old/historic, conqueror of all of the known world at that time in 330-320 BC.

And the Romans imported lots of Egyptian archeological stuff to Rome like Obelisks (Just go straight to the middle of the Saint Peters square today and have a rest 6 foot from one!)

Edit: Added when Augustus visited Alexandria and concede the word "ancient" might be wrong when the distance is just 300 years, which is a lot of time but not a lot lot of time as ancient usually signifies.

811

u/666Darkside666 Sep 25 '22

I just recently read that there are more Egyptian obelisks in Italy than in Egypt itself. Totally crazy if true.

738

u/Neato_Incognito3 Sep 25 '22

The only reason there are stil pyramids in Egypt is because they're too big to move (kidding not kidding)

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u/MrAlf0nse Sep 25 '22

Weren’t the pyramids “ancient” to Alexander when he saw them?

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u/Probonoh Sep 25 '22

Yes. They were approximately 2000 years old at the time.

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u/boccas Sep 25 '22 Helpful

Cleopatra is closer to Bitcoin than to the Egyptian empire foundation

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u/Tomatowithdepression Sep 25 '22

Argentina occupied California in 1818 for a week.

459

u/mu_10 Sep 25 '22

Maybe Argentina just wanted to visit California for vacation.. and they were also like " maybe just occupy them to reduce cost for living over there"

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u/itsme_Imtheproblem Sep 25 '22

Butterflies are fond of cow shit, fresh blood, and corpses.

1.8k

u/Grenouille86 Sep 25 '22

Also, they love pineapple!!

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u/Poorly-Drawn-Beagle Sep 25 '22

If we trained bees to like corpses we could make blood honey

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u/demonspawn1342 Sep 25 '22 Wholesome

They already exist. The species is called vulture bee or carrion bee, they feed on corpses and make honey.

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u/Feathertail80 Sep 25 '22

Snails have 14,000 teeth and eat bones and meat not just vegetables.

3.3k

u/MadClam97 Sep 25 '22

Some species can have up to 20,000 teeth! Oh, a snail's teeth are on its tongue

3.4k

u/Feathertail80 Sep 25 '22 Helpful

I love snail facts!! When they bite they feel like a lil cat tounge and it's adorable, my pet snails try and bite me all the time when I hold em. I know they are tryna eat me but it's cute.

1.4k

u/Dr-Causti Sep 25 '22

Motherfucking spongebob

603

u/Oraxy51 Sep 25 '22

The writer of SpongeBob was a marine biologist he knew damn well what he was doing

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u/Grenouille86 Sep 25 '22

I have so many questions!!

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u/Feathertail80 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22 Helpful

I have 5 giant African snails! The snails are very cheap to get but the setup is sorta expensive because thermostats are expensive but garden snails don't really need a thermostat and you can keep them as a pet too! They don't really.. think much they just vibe, but they can absolutely recognise your smell and get used to being handled baby snails or garden snails and sometimes just shy snails won't come out of their shells on your hand much but socialised snails can just chill on you.

They are really cool. I love em. They dig as well, which is interesting. But they also reproduce a lot at least giant Africans, they can mate by themselves and with others and have quite a few eggs and you unfortunately have to euthanise them because you can't just keep 30 giant snails' everytime they let eggs, that'd get outta control very quickly lmao, and they are very invasive and are illegal to release in the UK.

But I truly do love watching em grow and they get massive :)

440

u/chaos-calamity Sep 25 '22

Thank you for sharing facts about a thing you love with us. It makes me feel so seen when someone enjoys facts about things I love, so I want you to know I enjoyed this.

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u/Grenouille86 Sep 25 '22

You have pet snails!! 💕

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u/RockstarAgent Sep 25 '22

But wait? Could you dispose of a body by covering it in snails??????

Asking for science…

494

u/GozerDGozerian Sep 25 '22

Oh shit. Did science kill someone and is trying to cover it up?

243

u/The_Karaethon_Cycle Sep 25 '22

Physics kills people every day.

150

u/PM_me_your_fantasyz Sep 25 '22

Chemistry is pretty good at it too.

130

u/other_usernames_gone Sep 25 '22

Dont even get me started on biology.

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u/McFryin Sep 25 '22

I think you might be able to if you have enough time and enough snails. One time when I was little and we were on a camping trip I caught a small toad and a bunch of huge snails (land snails) and put them all in a container together (like I was gonna keep them as pets because... ya know... I was a kid). Anyway, woke up the next day and it seemed that the snails had completely devoured the small toad, literally nothing left.

Keep in mind though, I was a kid and one of my family members may have let the toad go or something while I was sleeping. So not sure if that happened or the snails ate the toad. This mystery has been bugging me for roughly 30 years.

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u/inklingitwill Sep 25 '22

Are your family members still around to ask? I want to know too now!

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u/Aspoonfulofjade Sep 25 '22 Helpful Wholesome

Human children don’t get knee caps until 3 years old

2.8k

u/stryph42 Sep 25 '22 Silver

And sometimes that don't develop quite the way they should and now my knees are fucky for the rest of my life.

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u/not_a_robot2 Sep 25 '22

Not to brag, but I got them at 2 years 323 days.

1.2k

u/baxbooch Sep 25 '22

Jokes on you, they’re gonna wear out 42 days sooner than everybody else’s!

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u/babyjo1982 Sep 25 '22

Which is extra weird when you consider their first form of self mobility is skidding around on no kneecaps

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u/KarmaCommando_ Sep 25 '22

knee caps

They do have a sort of proto-kneecap made of cartilage which hardens into bone as they grow older. So its not as if nothing is there.

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u/mjohnsimon Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22 Helpful

Dinosaurs were around for so long that there were already dinosaur fossils while they were still alive.

Basically, as T-Rex was munching away on Triceratop steaks, Stegosaurus had already been dead and underground for millions of years by that point.

1.7k

u/meat_popsicle13 Sep 25 '22

The gap between Stegosaurus and Tyrannosaurus was around 66 million years, which is about the same as the gap between Tyrannosaurus and us (and modern dinosaurs = birds).

536

u/chrisxls Sep 25 '22

Stegosauruses predate flowers. That’s hard to think about… flowers as a recent innovation.

375

u/Usama_the_llama Sep 25 '22

Sharks predate trees.

They also predate the rings of Saturn

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u/Unhappy-Nail-9281 Sep 25 '22

The lighter was invented before matches.

795

u/Misterbellyboy Sep 25 '22

This one always kind of made sense to me though, when you think about how people used to start fires. At the time, a self contained flint box with fuel probably seemed a little more obvious than putting a wad of chemicals on the end of a toothpick.

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u/Malgas Sep 25 '22

Yep, a lighter is basically just a wheellock mechanism strapped to a spirit lamp, but matches are some pretty sophisticated chemistry.

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u/StenSoft Sep 25 '22

The fax machine was invented before the telephone

1.8k

u/boklenhle Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

Holy shit. I thought you were flat out lying. Fax machine was invented in 1843.

2.9k

u/DBTornado Sep 25 '22 Helpful

Bonus Fact: There was a brief window in time (22 years in theory, but more likely 5-12 years) where a samurai could have sent a fax to Abraham Lincoln.

1.8k

u/GypDan Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22 Gold Helpful Table Slap

Michael Bay reading this thread to his assistant

"WRITE THAT DOWN!

WRITE THAT SHIT DOWN!"

448

u/vinoa Sep 25 '22

The Last Facsimile

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u/TheRetroToad Sep 25 '22

These are some nice faxts!

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u/EverydayVelociraptor Sep 25 '22

The Pencil was invented in 1795.

The Egyptians were using split reed, the precursor to fountain pens, in 3200BC.

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u/ACatInAHat Sep 25 '22

Makes sense. Matches are made with complex chemistry. A lighter is steel and a rock combined.

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u/oy-cunt- Sep 25 '22 Wholesome

Cleopatra only had 2 great grandparents.

2.2k

u/_weirdness Sep 25 '22 Silver Vibing

Sweet home ancient egypt

416

u/Brandon29 Sep 25 '22

Singing that in my head was fun

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u/Duncan970 Sep 25 '22

Alligators will give manatees the right of way if they are swimming near each other

1.2k

u/holy_noly Sep 25 '22

Did you know that touching a manatee is illegal? It's punishable under the Manatee Sanctuary Act, with a fine of up to $500 and/or a jail term of up to 60 days

634

u/RASCLEMAN Sep 25 '22

Are you a manatee toucher? Shame on you

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u/Black---Sun Sep 25 '22

Australia has the largest amount of wild camels in the world.

There are more pet tigers in Texas than there are in the wild of the entire planet.

773

u/FinoPepino Sep 25 '22

That’s really depressing

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u/divshappyhour Sep 25 '22 Silver Gold To The Stars

The day Michael Jackson's hair caught fire while filming a Pepsi commercial was the exact middle of his life.

Born: August 29, 1958

(9,281 days)

Pepsi incident: January 27, 1984

(9,281 days)

Died: June 25, 2009

3.4k

u/Impastaz72 Sep 25 '22 Silver Helpful

That sure was a midlife crisis

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u/anadvancedrobot Sep 25 '22

This reminds me of how Tolkien died in 1973, which is the order the rings were introduced in reverse.

3 for the Elves, 7 for the Dawlfs, 9 for Man and 1 ring to rule them all.

663

u/Neat_Counter7528 Sep 25 '22 Silver

And the hobbit book was published back in 1937

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u/dull_storyteller Sep 25 '22

Attila the Hun died from a nose bleed on his wedding night

395

u/_-__-__-__-__-_-_-__ Sep 25 '22

That anime trope makes sense now

31

u/gustav_mannerheim Sep 25 '22

I mean, it's not like it was anywhere near his first wedding night. Just his last.

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u/spookyskelley Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

Humans can smell geosmin (the chemical released when it rains or snows) at 5 parts per trillion. Which means that humans are 200,000 times more sensitive to smelling geosmin than sharks are at smelling blood.

237

u/StrawberryLeche Sep 26 '22

No wonder people can smell rain, it sounds dumb but makes sense survival wise

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u/namjd72 Sep 26 '22

This one did it. Blew my mind and I can go no further.

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u/Yrrebnot Sep 25 '22

Sharks existed before grass.

1.1k

u/miker53 Sep 25 '22

And trees. Trees used to not have an enzyme to decay their bark so they just laid on the ground for millions of years which is also why we have coal.

552

u/crank__ Sep 25 '22

Actually it's that fungi hadn't evolved to break down trees, then when they evolved to break down cellulose they boomed in population and coal/diamonds/fossil fules pretty much stopped being produced naturally

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u/Tontonsb Sep 25 '22

Nintendo was founded in 1889.

581

u/Benjimite_ Sep 25 '22

They started as a game company aswell 👀 they were a gaming cards company

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u/sushandeep Sep 25 '22

Bananas are berries and strawberries aren't.

512

u/Princess-Jaya Sep 25 '22

Neither are raspberries or blackberries. However, watermelons, cucumbers, and squashes are all berries.

752

u/theotherquantumjim Sep 25 '22 Silver Wholesome

I hate all of this information.

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u/Eremitic23 Sep 25 '22

The greenland shark, has a life expectancy of between 250-500 years. That means there could be a greenland shark swimming around, that swam the oceans when the Spanish conquistadors went to search Mexico for gold, which at that time, were inhabited by the Aztecs.

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u/G4rg0yle_Art1st Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

There was a really old church somewhere in northern Europe where it was discovered that a viking had written a message on a support beam several meters from the ground. There was then a tedious effort dedicated to climbing up while keeping the Churches integrity and when they got to it, the message translated to "This is very high". It was an ancient Viking prank.

Additionally the internet is held together with tape, glue, hope, and furries.

Edit: I found an article about it and in an effort to prevent misinformation I'll post it here for people to read. It was a mound, not a church. Their leader was on his way to a parish when a bad storm hit, so they camped inside the mound until the storm passed, spending their time making graffiti.

933

u/sir_woofington Sep 25 '22

This might be a long shot but I remember reading somewhere that you can find Norse runes graffitied on a Greek temple and they basically translate to: [name] was here."

739

u/Nutzori Sep 25 '22

It's the Hagia Sophia! "Halfdan was here."

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u/astrielx Sep 25 '22

Oxford University predates the Aztec Empire by 3.5 centuries.

1.7k

u/couchcrestation Sep 25 '22

I've tried to explain just how old oxford is to so many people (mainly my dad who doesn't believe me) but this statement might help.

1.5k

u/astrielx Sep 25 '22

"There is evidence of teaching as early as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest university in continuous operation."

Aztec Empire - Founded: 1428

Sounds like your dad needs to learn how to Google.

49

u/allboolshite Sep 25 '22

"That doesn't sound right."

- u/couchcrestation's dad, probably

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u/Whyisthethethe Sep 25 '22

The aztec empire wasn’t actually that old. People see a non-European civilisation and assume it was the same forever

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u/Angel_OfSolitude Sep 25 '22

The Mantis shrimp punches so hard it generates light.

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u/Slug212 Sep 25 '22

Had to Google.

Because they strike so rapidly, they generate vapor-filled bubbles in the water known as cavitation bubbles. The collapse of these bubbles produces measurable forces on their prey in forces of 1,500 newtons that are caused by the impact against the striking surface. The prey is hit twice by a single strike; first by the claw and then by the collapsing bubbles that immediately follow. Even if the initial strike misses the prey, the resulting shock wave can be enough to stun or kill…..Wow.

Mantis shrimp uses quick attack! It’s super effective

1.0k

u/Tony_Solo Sep 25 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

One Punch Shrimp

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u/Adler4290 Sep 25 '22

Please, can we ban scientists from making these shrimp human-sized?

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u/SonofBeckett Sep 25 '22

If district 9 has taught me anything, it’s that if we do create them, we’ll make sure they live in tenements.

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u/skaliton Sep 25 '22

honestly 'just google the mantis shrimp' is the best guidance for anyone who sees this. Basically every fact about them sounds like you told a kid to make things up to make it sound interesting

246

u/I_Pariah Sep 25 '22

Also look up Pistol Shrimp. Can also generate light from cavitation bubbles although not from striking but snapping its claw.

185

u/K_cutt08 Sep 25 '22

Pistol Shrimp can Thanos snap you.

Mantis Shrimp is Saitama, One Punch Man.

Got it.

I remember reading that the pistol shrimp snap boils the water around the snap in a small area, killing its prey from a combination of both pressure and heat. Crazy.

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u/Angel_OfSolitude Sep 25 '22

They're really neat critters. I'd like to get one some day.

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u/sheepywife Sep 25 '22

People were on the moon before they put wheels on suitcases.

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u/lunar_pilot Sep 25 '22

Priorities

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u/NicPizzaLatte Sep 25 '22

"Look, I can just screw them on myself. You won't have to do anything. You guys can keep working on your rocket."

"No. No wheels on suitcases until we get people on the moon. We gotta keep our priorities straight."

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u/Common-Wish-2227 Sep 25 '22

Pratchett wrote the Luggage after seeing a lady pull around a suitcase with wheels.

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u/Maleficent-Motor-974 Sep 25 '22 Silver Helpful

Apparently, elephants really do have great memories. Earlier this year, an elephant killed a woman. A few days later it escaped its enclosure and traveled 130miles to rip her out of her casket at her funerals and sling her body around. Idk what she did to that elephant, but it did not forget.

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u/scardrap Sep 25 '22

i heard she killed its child for hunting purposes

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u/strong_grey_hero Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22 Helpful LOVE! Bravo Grande!

I heard a story one time about a man that came across a baby elephant while on safari in Africa, and the elephant was all tangled up in a poachers snare trap. The man carefully approached the scared elephant, and was able to saw through the wire using his Swiss Army knife. The little elephant scampered away, but turned to face the man as he rejoined his herd, and raised his trunk as if to say ‘thank you’.

Twelve years later, the same man went to a circus in a nearby town. He watched the acrobats, tight rope walkers, and equestrians work their magic. Then the elephants came out. He couldn’t help to think of the safari and the little elephant he saved. As a matter of fact, the second biggest elephant kind of reminded him of that little one. Halfway through the act, the elephant caught the man staring and smiling. After that, the elephant would turn and look at the man as the routine allowed. When the routine was over, the elephant broke free of its trainers and ran up into the stands where it trampled the man to death.

Turns out it was a different elephant.

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u/Gerb_the_Barbarian Sep 25 '22

Dang it, you had me going there

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u/kangarookickers Sep 25 '22

This was the best story to read while taking a shit

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u/drax3012 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

We are closer to the last ever dinosaur than the last dinosaur was to the first ever dinosaur.

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u/Tiltedheaded Sep 25 '22 Silver Wholesome

Depends where you place them in the museum, really.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22 Silver

Sharks are older than the rings of Saturn

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u/ThePhabtom4567 Sep 25 '22

For some reason, this one hit the hardest for me. Like were talking about an astronomical unit of time in comparing it to The timeline of organisms on the planet. It just doesn't compute.

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u/0ddcharlie Sep 25 '22

In the Pompeii eruption, the extreme heat caused some victims' brain tissue to turn to glass.

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u/acevonovich Sep 25 '22

Cleopatra is closer in time to the first Pizza Hut than the building of the pyramids of Giza

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u/ronin668 Sep 25 '22

King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden were turned away from a German restaurant in 2011 since there were no free tables and they didn't have a reservation.

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u/Adler4290 Sep 25 '22

Tbh I think they enjoyed the anonymity and were not recognized.

In 1912 the Danish king was visiting Hamburg and was out walking in civilian clothes and had a heart attack.

Due to people not knowing who he was, he was first ignored then taken to a hospital for anyone and then died there.

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u/Siogin_Eire Sep 25 '22

a hospital for anyone

Lmao

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u/IKnowIYam Sep 25 '22

I mean if there’s no space there’s no space…

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u/42mepey Sep 25 '22

Abraham Lincoln died before the Samurai were abolished as a caste.

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u/Yrrebnot Sep 25 '22

And could have sent one a fax.

796

u/Glencannnon Sep 25 '22

This one is paying attention

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u/blinky9021Flow Sep 25 '22 Silver

Meaning he couldve fought with Samurai during his Vampire hunting days

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u/thedragoncompanion Sep 25 '22 Silver

Koalas are so dumb that they can't recognise a eucalyptus leaf if it isn't attached to a tree.

1.8k

u/SafewordisJohnCandy Sep 25 '22

They seem like a species that evolved to not survive.

2.4k

u/Cevius Sep 25 '22 Gold

Their stupidity is also a strength, because they are literally too stupid to suffer, so will willingly just sit in a tree, eat one specific type of leaf, and scream for a mate to show up to make more of the stupid things.

Monsoonal rains? Don't care

Struck by lightning? Burnt eucalyptus leaves, singed fur, and a large serving of not caring

Fall out of tree? Bounce on the ground and keep truckin along

If we weren't killing off their natural habitat by logging, they'd probably outlive us all, out of sheer chronic indifference to any stimulus.

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u/0najimi Sep 25 '22

makes me think of the dodo bird being so dumb that when it was attacked by something, and sees it again later it just didnt care so they were easy prey and died off

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u/gallerton18 Sep 25 '22

Dodos at least had a reason, they didn’t have any natural predators and therefore just didn’t have any reason to know fear.

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u/MagicBez Sep 25 '22

They discovered the rare but super effective evolutionary niche of being so cute that humans will feed and look after you.

242

u/nickk326 Sep 25 '22

How are we supposed to feed them if the leaves are in our hands and not on a tree?

128

u/lakmus85_real Sep 25 '22

"just become a tree"

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u/BeastAlpha07 Sep 25 '22

Cheetahs don't roar, they meow.

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u/YourMomSmokesMeth Sep 25 '22

The chainsaw was invented to aid in childbirth. It was used and invented in the 1700s to cut through the woman's pelvic bone before C-sections became the commonplace way to deliver babies.

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u/RadicalSnowdude Sep 26 '22

I’m sorry but what the fuck?

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u/Tel-aran-rhiod Sep 25 '22

Cats can drink seawater

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u/Ashvibes17305000 Sep 25 '22 Silver Wholesome

There are more trees on earth than stars in the galaxy. I didn't believe it myself at first

401

u/Seaweed-Suspicious Sep 25 '22

Wow this is one of the few in this thread that actually blew my mind

340

u/rcktjck Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Tbf, we are just talking about one galaxy here. There are estimated to be about 200 billion galaxies in the known universe. ( With some new estimates going up to 1 trillion)

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u/StenSoft Sep 25 '22 Silver

True, there are around 100 billion stars in the Milky Way but around 3 trillion (30× more) trees on Earth.

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u/ScrapzGD Sep 25 '22 Helpful

nipples on men exist just because the Y chromosome kicks in later

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u/Adam-Kay- Sep 25 '22

For anyone who doesn’t understand what this means, when humans are growing in the womb, they all start off as female, and then if you have a Y chromosome it kicks in later in the development and you become male. This is also why the clitoris kinda resembles a penis (or, technically, the other way round)

1.1k

u/NotATroll_ipromise Sep 25 '22 Wholesome Hugz

Is that why mine is so small?

710

u/Mando_calrissian423 Sep 25 '22

I mean, but think about how HUGE it’d be if it were a clitoris!

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u/klakkrr Sep 25 '22

The national animal of Scotland is the unicorn.

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u/UniquePotato Sep 25 '22

McDonalds feeds 1% of the world’s population daily.

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u/Muted-Radish6071 Sep 25 '22

Snakes have necks and tails

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u/Aggravating_Speed665 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

A fully loaded Amazon Kindle is a billionth of a billionth of a gram heavier than an empty one.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Poorly-Drawn-Beagle Sep 25 '22

There’s a penguin named Brigadier Sir Nils Olav III who is the ceremonial head of the Norwegian Royal Guard

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u/recidivx Sep 25 '22

And he lives in Scotland.

152

u/Poorly-Drawn-Beagle Sep 25 '22

He’s being held captive by the enemy

Maybe he surrendered himself as a hostage. A true father to his men.

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u/LocusFabrications Sep 25 '22

He lives in edinburgh zoo, holds the rank of colonel-in-chief and actually does inspections and ceremonial duties! Other rank holding animals include:
- a goat, Lance Corporal William Windsor I of the British Army
- a bear, Corporal Wojtek of the Polish Land Forces
-a miniature poodle, Air Chief Marshal Fufu of the Royal Thai Air Force

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u/Rolling_Beardo Sep 25 '22

When the Great Pyramids were being built woolly mammoths we still alive.

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Technically true, which is the best kind.

IIRC that’s true due to one species of pygmy wooly mammoth on a secluded island that still lived at the time.

It’s not the full size mammoth roaming Asia that people would probably be thinking of.

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u/epgenius Sep 25 '22 Helpful

You don’t poop or pee burnt fat, you exhale it

357

u/mattso989 Sep 25 '22

Yes, you lose weight by breathing!

265

u/Admirable-Door1724 Sep 25 '22

starts breathing faster

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u/TurbulentDesigner829 Sep 25 '22

If earth suddenly stopped spining almost everyone would die within 3 secs.

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u/Peanutshroom Sep 25 '22

How will this affect airplanes or basically anything flying?

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u/AlecsThorne Sep 25 '22

Neat. What would happen if it gently slowed down to a halt though?

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u/PterionFracture Sep 25 '22

Mass extinction, just slower.

Nights and days would slowly get longer and longer, causing crop failures. When the earth turns slowly enough that night lasts for months, farming is only possible in the half of the world with sunlight. This is a constantly changing half of the world. At some point the illuminated portion of the world is almost exclusively the Pacific Ocean: https://i.imgur.com/CyIsnKV.png. All other life is blanketed in darkness for months- long enough to deplete agriculture and starve out most species of animals.

Not all life would perish. Some bacteria, fungi, algae, and sea life would survive. Maybe some plant species can adapt to an extremely long night cycle. But this would be a mass extinction event for most species of plants and animals.

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u/HighlandsBen Sep 25 '22

Whiplash?

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u/TurbulentDesigner829 Sep 25 '22

Nope, imagine your body being thrown at a wall with the speed of 1000 miles per hour.

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u/aph81 Sep 25 '22

Why is that? Because we would be smashed?

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u/Weird-Thread Sep 25 '22

As someone above said, inertia will throw us with speeds greater than sound. So yes we would be smashed.

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u/BagelSteamer Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died on the same day, the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence being signed. Both of their last words were along the lines of “My friend Adams/Jefferson still lives”. They shared almost the same last words but had no idea one of them were already dead.

Edit: I have been corrected. It was the Declaration of Independence, not the Constitution.

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u/Ok_Storage525 Sep 25 '22

I once read that if you keep a goldfish in a dark room, it will eventually turn white.

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u/Penetrable-hole133 Sep 25 '22

So does get spooked by the darkness so much that it turns white?

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u/JazzPhobic Sep 25 '22

Angelina Jolie was very suicidal early in her life and hired a hitman to end her. The Hitman however decided to try and get her better instead.

244

u/Horne-Fisher Sep 25 '22

Sound like the way to earn a repeat customer

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u/PhesteringSoars Sep 25 '22

The last official execution by guillotine was 1977 September 10th at Baumetes Prison in Marseille, France.

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u/Enough_Variation6001 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

In a group of 40 people, there is a 91% chance that two people share a birthday.

ETA: Here is a link to a Vsauce2 video explaining this. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ofTb57aZHZs&feature=youtu.be. Credits to u/nournnn

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u/Infamous_fire94 Sep 25 '22

In 1895 there were 2 cars out of the entire state of Ohio and they still managed to crash into each other

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u/askXmeXaboutX2006-7 Sep 25 '22

Both Stalin and Hitler were briefly in the same city as each other (Vienna) before they met (or knew about each other, at least).

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u/UniquePotato Sep 25 '22

And Trotsky & Tito

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u/Adler4290 Sep 25 '22

And Freud, all at the same time, in 1913.

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u/mebame Sep 25 '22 Silver

Yeah, post world war Vienna looked like a Doctor Who season's casting.

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u/Ohhhhcanadada Sep 25 '22

Sharks who hang out on sandbars a lot can get a sun tan.

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u/Kotelves911 Sep 25 '22

Malaria killed dinosaurs.

So to all of y’all that had malaria and lived: you’re tougher than a dinosaur. Or at least your immune system is.

667

u/ak_opt1 Sep 25 '22

All the planets in the solar system can fit between the earth and the moon

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u/scumbagstaceysEx Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

Insurance companies most years pay out more dollars in claims and loss expenses than they collect in premium dollars. They make all their money by investing the premium dollars before they have to pay them out.

Edit: I’m talking about car and home insurance. Health insurance works differently and I never worked in that field so I don’t know.

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u/JustcallmeY_ Sep 25 '22

America has never lost a war when they used a donkey in their army

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22

3 of my grandparents have the same birthday and two of them on the same year

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u/Nbardo11 Sep 25 '22

Solid matter is made up of mostly empty space.

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u/PopEye-GoFuKYourSelf Sep 25 '22

If you were to shrink the Earth, with all of its Hills and valleys and oceans and peaks, down to the size of a cue ball, it would be smoother on its surface than any cue ball manufactured to date. The highest and lowest points on Earth are separated by a mere 12.2 miles, miniscule compared to the overall surface area of the planet.

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u/That_Phony_King Sep 25 '22

The universe’s resources are finite and eventually the processes making new stars will be unable to continue. The universe will become a dark void intermittently filled with stellar bodies.

We live in a glorious time where we can see beautiful pictures of the stars and enjoy them from our backyards. Count yourself lucky.

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u/Maximum-Ad7584 Sep 25 '22

Even black holes will eventually die out. When the time comes when the universe would just be a black void, time would officially be pointless since nothing has power to change. Or atleast thats what I heard

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u/mitchade Sep 25 '22

More people drown in the desert than die of dehydration.

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u/Muted_Ad5364 Sep 25 '22

A spider called the banana spider, can bite you and cause a painful Erection that last hours

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u/V4cras Sep 25 '22

Volkswagens most sold product is a sausage

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u/Old_Ad2871 Sep 25 '22

Bears eat beets

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u/richkidzbitchkidz Sep 25 '22 Hugz

Bears, beets, battlestar galactica

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u/SnooRadishes3472 Sep 25 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

The creation of sticky notes was a result of glue that wasn’t sticky and deemed a failure( 3M)

The formula was put in the records as a failure and later a scientist found it to be useful to stick notes to his workbench.

Then we got sticky notes

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u/novaorld Sep 25 '22

The oldest hotel in the world is The Nishiyama Onsen Keiunkan in Japan and has been in business since 705AD. The crazy thing is that it’s still a family business. For 52 generations