r/pics Sep 23 '22 Silver 2 Gold 1 Take My Energy 1 Buff Doge 1

Landlord says the home we’re renting doesn’t have hard water. This is after boiling water one time.

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61.7k Upvotes

15.3k

u/BeersTeddy Sep 23 '22 Helpful All-Seeing Upvote

Warning:

This rock might contain traces of water

1.6k

u/triton2toro Sep 24 '22

There’s hard water, and then there’s this. This water is like early 90’s NWA type hard.

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u/Marionboy Sep 24 '22

Straight Outta Limestone

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u/Instantsausage Sep 24 '22

Fuck tha pumice

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u/PedroEglasias Sep 24 '22

Crazy motherfucker named Gypsum!

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u/Jonny_Wurster Sep 24 '22

You are now about to witness the strength of calcium

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u/Capital_Morning9688 Sep 24 '22

Please guys be gneiss

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u/Epicritical Sep 24 '22

Don’t take this for granite

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u/buthidae Sep 24 '22

Swing down, sweet calcium stop and let me ride

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u/Wizzle-Stick Sep 24 '22

Coming straight outta limestone, crazy mutha fuckin ice cubes, from the trays come hard water deposits dude.

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22

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u/snakesoup88 Sep 24 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Let the kids play with a slip and slide on the front lawn. Then have your own little Pompeii ready for Halloween.

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u/Zen_Diesel Sep 24 '22

Thank you, I needed a good guttural laugh.

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u/topcheesehead Sep 24 '22

They need more powdered water first

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u/SlothOfDoom Sep 23 '22 Wholesome

You don't have hard water, you have wet scale deposits.

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u/aloneinmyprincipals Sep 24 '22

4 real tho, how do you get rid of this type of thing? It leaves water marks on everything (obv not as bad as OP)

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u/wallawalla22 Sep 24 '22

Vinegar, CLR, any acid

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u/jubydoo Sep 24 '22

Hot vinegar will deal with a lot of hard water issues, though you want a well ventilated area. Not because it's dangerous, but because it stinks.

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u/CptTrizzle Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 25 '22 Silver Helpful

Hot citric acid will do the same magic without the smell fwiw!

Edit: never expected this to blow up lol I think it's hilarious that my top rated comment ever is about citric acid, you all rock! And since you're all so interested i though this may be helpful too.

Citric acid kills bacteria, mold, and mildew. It’s great for general disinfecting and cleaning. Note that it shouldn’t be used as a disinfectant against diseases like Covid-19.

Use as a Natural Alternative to Bleach Citric acid is a versatile ingredient, and can be used in a variety of situations, including:

Oven cleaners Dishwasher cleaners All-purpose cleaners Soap-scum removers Bathroom cleaners Carpet cleaner Dish soaps Laundry detergent Air fresheners Window cleaners Stain removers

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u/jubydoo Sep 24 '22

Good to know! Though part of the reason I go with vinegar is because white vinegar is cheap as dirt and works well for a number of cleaning tasks.

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u/CptTrizzle Sep 24 '22

Admittedly I've never done the price comparison, but thats pretty much my reason for citric acid replacing most of my cleaners other than bleach. Where I live it's $25/5lbs of powder that usually lasts me a bit over a year between dishes, laundry, windows, and metal cleaning.

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u/jubydoo Sep 24 '22

That's certainly something to look into, then. Because of my living situation I haven't had to buy any for a while, but I remember it as only a couple of bucks for a gallon of white vinegar, and since it's best to dilute it down a bit it can last a good while.

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u/CptTrizzle Sep 24 '22

Honestly, it's the best thing in my closet. Picked it up from mom when she started using it in laundry and now it's my go-to for everything. Water stains, stubborn sticky resins, clogged drains, rust removal, mopping, windows, electro-plating. I kid you not, this stuff cleans damn near everything I use it on.

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u/sickonmyface Sep 24 '22

Wait you can use citric acid for your laundry?

How do you do it? Just replace washing powder with citric acid in your drawer?

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u/Arkanor Sep 24 '22

Diet coke (or any generic equivalent) is an excellent strong acid that gets rid of all of this for super cheap. People often use lemon juice or something similar but you can't beat diet coke for strength or cost (diet because no sugar to get sticky)

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u/Raul_Coronado Sep 24 '22

bag of citric acid is way cheaper and better

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u/The_Dead_Kennys Sep 24 '22

Bonus: when buying citric acid, you can do the “white powder” gag from Way of the Househusband, lmao

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u/blindsamurai93 Sep 24 '22

Ah, a person of culture.

15

u/Flaky-Fish6922 Sep 24 '22

care to explain for the uncultured swine here?

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u/Grimm_Wright Sep 24 '22

Just smooth it out and place it in a large black briefcase

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u/nothanksreddit3 Sep 24 '22

It's also great for adding a lil zing to something you don't want to add additional liquid to (like homemade apple butter, lemon curd, etc), just be wary of the concentration. I like malic more but probably not as cheap.

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u/captainJmorgan Sep 24 '22

Will it work on hard water stains o. My car windows?

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u/CptTrizzle Sep 24 '22

Sure can

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u/Learned__Hand Sep 24 '22 Wholesome

So not out if a plastic or glass bottle, got it.

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u/-stuey- Sep 24 '22

Steel wool, regular old cheap ass steel wool you get from the super market works wonders on hard water stains on your cars glass. I was scared to try it as I thought it would somehow scratch my glass, so I tried it on the shower glass first and it came up brand new!

After that I did my car and you can literally feel the difference, and I realised my fears were completely unfounded.

I saw it on a Chris fix super cleaning video

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

[deleted]

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22

To clean the scale off in the dishwasher? Sure. I just use CLR. Diet Coke is better than nothing but it works no where near as well as CLR or even vinegar. It's more of a last resort thing to use when you have absolutely nothing else. I mean.....it is soda.

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u/Zpd8989 Sep 24 '22

I love the smell

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u/MrGrieves- Sep 24 '22

There are dozens of us.

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u/Diazmet Sep 24 '22

I love cleaning the flat top at work with vinegar… just bathing in it as my i berate my subordinates for disgusting me with their weakness.

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u/shredderbloodcopter Sep 24 '22

Oh my god.

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u/Diazmet Sep 24 '22

It really isn’t that bad, compared to the degreaser’s some places use, mmm what’s that smell oh yah it’s cancer

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u/acabist666 Sep 24 '22

I love the smell of acetic acid/vinegar. Reminds me of beautiful sunsets during a simpler time, high on intravenous black tar heroin.

Oh to be young.

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u/Paradigm6790 Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Not because it's dangerous, but because it stinks.

Flashbacks to being a prep-chef in highschool making balsamic vinegar reductions all day. =_____=;;

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22 Helpful

I did three hits of acid and it’s not better. If anything, I think everything is worse.

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u/-stuey- Sep 24 '22

Do some coke

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u/SippyTurtle Sep 24 '22

Yeah, Coca-Cola is pretty acidic.

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u/AalphaQ Sep 24 '22

"Oh wait, dont take THOSE man... Oooohhhhhhhhh huh huh huh, you just ate the most acid I've ever seen anyone eat in my life!"

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u/alex3omg Sep 24 '22

A water softener

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u/huggiesdsc Sep 24 '22

Kinda implies they do have hard water

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u/Throwawayfabric247 Sep 24 '22

Water softener and the other comment was spot off on how to treat after.

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22 edited Oct 23 '22

[deleted]

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u/Ventronics Sep 24 '22

You might be streets behind

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u/Throwawayfabric247 Sep 24 '22

😂 my bad. Tried to be punny.

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u/Protomeathian Sep 24 '22

I just put some lemon juice in whatever I need cleaned and leave it overnight. Comes right off and smells great.

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u/SamL214 Sep 24 '22

Just wait till you have silicates and a permanent water marks in your clear crystal glass. That shit is awful. Can’t ever figure a way around it, beauty is that it happens after 20 million dollars worth of water softening

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u/Nothing-Casual Sep 24 '22

20 million dollars worth of water softening

Breh either you're spending way too much on water softening or your city is spending way too little

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u/wallawalla22 Sep 24 '22

Softeners don't remove silica or silicates, you'd need an RO for that.

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u/Y0tsuya Sep 24 '22

Something acidic. My favorite now is citric acid since it doesn't give off an unpleasant odor like vinegar.

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u/cdnsalix Sep 24 '22

Buy a bag of citric acid off Amazon. That stuff is great. Has worked like a hot damn for me and doesn't sink like vinegar.

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u/635nM Sep 24 '22

Got a good 4" slump going there.

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u/madgunner122 Sep 24 '22

Too much superplascticizer, gonna have to reject the truck

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u/PicardZhu Sep 24 '22

add 2 gallons of water and spin it a couple of times. It'll be alright. Ain't sendin' no truck back -foreman

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u/I_like_dwagons Sep 24 '22

Sure! And when your 28 day breaks come back super low you can explain it to the client -the DPRC

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u/Real_Jackraps Sep 24 '22

Scale deposits are a typical indicator of hard water?

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u/Hobo124 Sep 24 '22

The joke is that they're saying the water is so hard it's more like their pipes pump wet scale than hard water.

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u/Real_Jackraps Sep 24 '22

Ahh that makes sense lol

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u/quietsam Sep 24 '22

Yeah…yeah it does. I get it. Man, I love jokes that I get, and boy oh boy this is definitely one of those

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u/MattieShoes Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

Hard water is minerals, typically calcium carbonate, dissolved in the water. When water evaporates, it leaves the calcium carbonate behind, which looks like this. This though... is an obscene amount. To the point I'm not even sure it's possible. Anyway, this calcium carbonate left behind is called scale. So the joke was that, rather than water with calcium in it, they have calcium with water in it.

There, I murdered the joke :-)

EDIT: Further info. Some amount of carbon dioxide dissolves in water. It forms carbonic acid. Then when the water flows through limestone, it liberates the calcium from the limestone and makes calcium carbonate. So sometimes you hear the scale called lime scale. It can do similar things with magnesium as well.

It tends to bond to soaps as well, hence soap scum. It'll also make soap less effective... This can be noticeable in dishwashers and washing machines where hard water can basically neutralize your detergent

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u/i_am_bombs Sep 24 '22

I appreciate that murder

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u/Suic1d3 Sep 24 '22

I too appreciate the murder. I didn't really know what hard water was but it was a term I'd been hearing for quite some time. However, monkey brain would always forget to research it.

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u/Similar_Radish8623 Sep 24 '22

That shit was premeditated

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u/skin_diver Sep 24 '22

Hard water, wet scale, pipes... pumping...somebody fuck already

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u/MattieShoes Sep 24 '22

We were just waiting for you bby

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u/im_just_thinking Sep 24 '22

Those wet scale pipes make my water so fucking hard

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u/darrellg_ Sep 24 '22

Thanks for the information I didn't know I wanted to know. Very cool.

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u/Majinburns Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

Yeah they have a little moisture in their limestone.

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u/NoThing2048 Sep 24 '22

I live in Vancouver, to me, hard water is called “ice”.

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u/Big-Duck-3304 Sep 24 '22

Vancouver water is fantastic.

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u/redonkulousness Sep 23 '22

R.I.P. Those pipes, the water heater, and appliances.

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u/JohnnySniper3 Sep 23 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Been here for 1.5 years. 2 washing machines replaced, 2 coffee makers, and we haven’t had hot water for the past 4 days. We’re hitting our limits.

EDIT- for those who see this, I believe it’s municipal water from the colorado river but I’m not sure right now. I think this is a product of the heat that the oven gives off while the empty pot was on the stove. However, the water is hard - we’ve replaced multiple appliances and many shower heads, our sinks are calcified, etc.

Thank you to everyone recommending testing it. I’ll test it and give the results to my landlord - hoping that will convince him to take action.

For those recommend a water softener. Funny thing, it’s right there in the garage. Looks like it hasn’t been used for years and the lines look as old as the house (early 90’s). There’s a bit wrong with the house - I don’t think it’s been well maintained for at least a decade. He has to at least fix the water if we’re going to stay.

EDIT 2: we tested the heat from the oven theory and it failed. This isn’t being cussed from additional heat given off from the oven. The water is just hard. Sorry to anyone who feels like I haven’t given adequate information. I’ve never had a post blow up & wasn’t prepared to face the comments, although many of them were hilarious. This is my final update - feel free to message me if you’re not satisfied.

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u/Pamzella Sep 24 '22

My goodness. Our municipal water is considered 19 on the hardness scale (out of 20) and it's never been that bad. Are you on well water?

Buy and use only RO or distilled water for coffee, electric kettle, at the very least. It'll taste better, too.

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u/Real_Jackraps Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

You should have done something a while ago. Your limit is just your emotional limit. The limit for bullshit was already passed a long time ago. Your landlord needs to buy you a water softener.

You need to take better care, it sounds you're getting taken advantage of. Best wishes

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u/DeckardPain Sep 24 '22

I’m more surprised the landlord doesn’t address the water softener out of their own interest. More than likely the landlord is covering the cost of all these new appliances.

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u/Thor4269 Sep 24 '22

Even if they don't cover the appliances, the buildup in the pipes is going to be a bitch down the line

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u/passinghere Sep 24 '22

More than likely the landlord is covering the cost of all these new appliances.

Not if it's unfurnished as there the tenant supplies all their own appliances, plus when did you ever hear of a landlord supplying coffee makers in a rented property

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u/Black_Moons Sep 24 '22

Coffee maker will be the tenants. Washing machine will generally be landlords, even in an unfurnished house. (Fridge, Oven, Washing machine and drier are generally landlords)

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u/PM_MeTittiesOrKitty Sep 24 '22

Washing machine will generally be landlords

Washing machine and drier could go either way. I've lived plenty of places without them. However, I have never lived in a place without a fridge or oven/stove provided even in unfurnished places. I am getting slumlord vibes from this thread though.

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u/TomGraphy Sep 24 '22

Los Angeles has a weird tradition of not providing fridges

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u/Rufus2468 Sep 24 '22

Here in Australia, getting a fridge with a rental is unheard of.
Everywhere I've rented comes empty, as is. In my last place, the fridge spot was so small it didn't even fit my fridge, so I put a shelving unit in there that became the microwave shelf, and fridge went out next to the dining table.

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u/ricepalace Sep 24 '22

Thtsso weird to me. In the US fridge, stove, hot water heater are all supplied. Which I agree with. Why would you have to move a refrigerator to a new apt. I also live I NYC and if you dont have hot water you're allowed to with hold rent, that also goes with heat in the winter.

Who has a normal apt without a refrigerator? Like shouldn't that just say with the place? My apt here is have to move a fridge in up 4 stairs through 3 doorways back down 4 stairs up 4 stairs then up 20 stairs make a tight right turn then move it into my apt then move it into the kitchen. Haha.

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u/Roric30 Sep 24 '22

Ha when I moved to Germany I was confronted with the reality that Germans take LITERALLY everything with them when they move.

Light fixtures. Washing machines. Entire kitchens. As in they take the counters and cabinets with them.

When you move into an unfurnished apartment here it's literally the walls, floor, ceiling and maybe a light bulb if you're lucky.

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u/hoggerfan69 Sep 24 '22

Inthe Netherlands they even take the floor

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u/emote_control Sep 24 '22

What is the point of all that nonsense? Unless your new kitchen has exactly the same layout you're stuck with a bunch of expensive trash. And the next person has to waste money installing identical fixtures when they could just use yours. What a god damn waste. Disgraceful.

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u/Wisc_Bacon Sep 24 '22

Lived in a hood in Iowa some years back, landlord didn't supply stoves or fridge. Tenants would have to get them through other means, and then when they ultimately od'd, went to jail, or got kicked out he would repossess it and sell it to another tenant.

Honestly he did that with all their belongings, including drugs. I worked for him for cash as a runaway teenager emptying their apartments.

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u/Lor1an Sep 24 '22

"Here's a nice fridge, it can be yours to furnish your shiny new apartment for just $400!"

"What are you, high? Just give us a fridge!"

"Whoa! Someone's a bit rough around the edges today. Speaking of high, I could get you something to take the edge off for just $80 an ounce, if you know what I mean..."

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u/TopAd9634 Sep 24 '22

I hope things have gotten better for you.

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u/Kapp_E_Tan Sep 24 '22

Well Kale, avocado and edemame are fine on the counter so no one there needs one

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u/TomGraphy Sep 24 '22

But you need one to store iced coffee

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u/ogdonut Sep 24 '22

My rental has washer and dryer hookups but didn't come with them.

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u/anaserre Sep 24 '22

I live in a small town in Oklahoma and most landlords around here don’t provide refrigerators, stoves , washer , dryer or even window unit air conditioners for homes without central air. Big time slumlord town.

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u/PIBM Sep 24 '22

Washing machine, dryer, dishwasher, fridge and oven aren't included around here..

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u/Master_Maniac Sep 24 '22

My brain is conjuring an image of someone just stationed between a water pump and tank, filling baloons from the pump, fluffing them like pillows and then dumping them into the tank.

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u/thirdeyefish Sep 24 '22

Depending how patient one is. Fill and drain balloons until they are full of scale powder. One final fill and ATTACK!

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u/longhairedcountryboy Sep 24 '22

I have one and it makes a big difference.

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u/sgreadly Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

Mate, how’s the maintenance? As in, how often do you have to maintain if, how much does that cost, and what do you do?

Edit: thanks to all! - easier than to reply to each one. Appreciate the input.

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u/longhairedcountryboy Sep 24 '22

Depending on how bad the water is you need to replace the media ever few years. Some require salt on a regular basis. That depends on what is in the water you want to have removed. If it's true hardness they run on salt. It doesn't make the water salty, most of the salt is flushed out of the filter after it runs.

If it's sulphur or iron you are removing, those don't use salt. They run a backflush about once a week.

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u/reddit_is_addicting_ Sep 24 '22

What does one do when the water has minerals in it like that?

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u/DeckardPain Sep 24 '22

That’s the aftermath I believe. But what you need to do is get a water softener. Not only will it prevent issues with your pipes later on but it will make your showers more enjoyable.

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u/PearofGenes Sep 24 '22

Maybe your landlord is just dumb. They're probably paying for the large appliances so it's in their interest to soften the water

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u/TheGonz75 Sep 24 '22

Wyoming? When I lived in Wyoming, the water was not quite that bad, but close. I think my town’s water had about 10x the ideal amount of minerals, but it was still enough to be within EPA regs.

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u/Synesterfate Sep 24 '22

Sounds like since you are renting it’s time to find a new place?

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u/nj23dublin Sep 24 '22

Honestly a water softener does a good job but it still won’t solve it 100%.. we use a softener and you can get one for 700-1000 which your landlord should get but we still use filters and buy drinking water too

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u/Jetztinberlin Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

FYI, drinking hard water has moderate health benefits and bottled drinking water is both less safe / regulated hygenically in most parts of the world, and also horrifically bad for the environment.

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u/Cynagen Sep 24 '22

At this level of hardness though, you're risking developing kidney stones. Source: myself because I grew up in a town notorious for pumping well water for the mains without treating it for hardness, and everyone in town where they had well water had hard water coming from the tap. Drank the city water for years, and right after I became an adult, bam, kidney stones.

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u/Longtermthrowaway5 Sep 24 '22

so your source is a single anecdote?

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u/Jetztinberlin Sep 24 '22

You know, it's interesting. Individual studies contradict each other on whether there's a link btwn hardness and stone risk, but the only metaanalysis I saw found that it actually has a slight protective effect! However, in any case if you want to avoid it, a Brita will do so without all the risks and negative impacts of bottled water.

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u/Otterfan Sep 24 '22

The slight positive effect actually makes sense.

Most kidney stones are composed of calcium and oxalate. Doctors advise maintaining a high calcium diet to prevent kidney stones, since dietary calcium will join with the oxalate in the intestine and pass out in feces. Hard water has lots of calcium.

If there isn't enough calcium to join with the oxalate in the intestine, the oxalate will be absorbed into the body and passed into urine where it might bind with calcium and form kidney stones.

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u/thehalfwit Sep 24 '22

I had to replace a water heater that was more than 2/3 filled with solid deposits -- filled to just under the top heating element. It took me forever to flush it out to where I could move it.

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u/redonkulousness Sep 24 '22

That's suuuuuucks.

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u/thehalfwit Sep 24 '22

On the bright side, I managed to find a used 40-gallon water heater to replace it, and built a stand out of some 2x4s to allow it to reach the existing fittings for less than $100.

Totally not up to code, but I got my hot water back.

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u/Brex91 Sep 24 '22

Try flushing it every year to stay on top of the build up. I still have to replace mine because I didn't know before

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u/Drpoopbutt6969 Sep 24 '22

I live in an area with extremely hard water as well. I know that because I used to be a water operator for my town.

I boil water all the time and never have I experienced this….

You might have a larger issue at play.

Also, if you move and you stay in the same town your water quality will stay the same - again I used to work in municipal water.

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u/pizark22 Sep 24 '22

They might be on a well...

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u/Mr_kill_666 Sep 24 '22

Landlord: “oh well…. rents still due on the 15th.”

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u/Mutagrawl Sep 24 '22

You'll get your rent when you fix this damn D̶o̶o̶r̶ well!

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u/Brett420 Sep 24 '22

This was my thought as well. I live in an area known for having very hard water due to the enormous amount of limestone - to the point I'm so used to it that any time I'm on a trip and shower somewhere with soft water it grosses me out.

But this is absurd. I'll often get a small white ring around the pot after boiling water, but I've never seen anything like this photo in my life.

I would advise u/JohnnySniper3 talk to their neighbors to see if anyone else in the immediate area is experiencing anything similar.

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u/sleeplessone Sep 24 '22

Only time I've ever seen this is if you just leave the water in the pot and either boil it all off or leave it out so long it evaporates.

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u/PoBoyPoBoyPoBoy Sep 24 '22

It still shouldn’t look like that… unless you have hard water. Which is what OP did and their point.

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u/Saucy6 Sep 24 '22

Slimy water in the shower does take some time getting used to

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u/koenkamp Sep 24 '22

As someone who's never lived with hard water this comment is so freaking weird to me. How is water with less minerals and shit in it slimy? It's just like, more pure water.

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u/CoolUsernamesTaken Sep 24 '22

I lived all my life with soft water, and moved for a year to a place with incredibly (at least to me) hard water.

It’s because hard water removes the moisture of your skin, your skin feels like sandpaper after a bath. The slimy feeling is actually what healthy skin should feel like, not the other way around, but I guess people get used to it.

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u/rhiz0me Sep 24 '22

It’s not less minerals, it’s more, it changes the chemical makeup of water so that calcium doesn’t calcify, it will even erode copper over type, water softening is not water purifying. If you’ve ever had one you’d know that you have constantly put new water softening salt into the water softener which adds it to the water in the house.

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u/MyOtherSide1984 Sep 24 '22

Literally just moved into my first place with a water softener and this post is helpful to know that it takes upkeep. How often is "constantly"? Only been here a week

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u/Muad-_-Dib Sep 24 '22

I think the reason people are having issues with the claims about soft water is that there is a difference between hard water that is treated via softener to become "soft water" and actual natural soft water.

Water Softener appliances work by using resin beads to absorb excess minerals in water and replace them with sodium or potassium, then when the beads become clogged they need to be flushed with high concentration sodium or potassium solutions in order to revive the beads and allow them to absorb more minerals.

Natural soft water has none of that, it just straight up doesn't have much of any minerals in it in the first place so there is no reason to add anything to it.

So you get the benefits of soft water like soaps and shampoos being able to form lathers really easily and appliances that use water not being clogged with shit after a few years of use as well as the chief benefit of the water tasting clean and fresh.

While having none of the downsides of artificially softened water that leaves way more sodium or potassium on you that creates the slimy feeling or the need to buy a water softener and top it off every now and then.

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u/bw1985 Sep 24 '22

Slimy feeling after showing is from hard water or soft water?

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u/Brett420 Sep 24 '22

Soft. It feels like I can't get dry after, and like I didn't get as clean (even though soap actually works better with softer water - it's just a "feel" thing).

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u/bw1985 Sep 24 '22

Gotcha. Had that slimy feeling growing up and never knew what it was about. TIL.

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u/dopefish917 Sep 24 '22

for me it feels like soap never comes off in soft water

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u/Mission_Asparagus12 Sep 24 '22

Hardness can be kind of relative. Hard water in one part of the country can seem very much not in another. My city water is very hard. Not quite this bad, but bad enough to leave residue about half this thick each boil. Softener fixed it. Generally though, 0 to 60 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as calcium carbonate is classified as soft; 61 to 120 mg/L as moderately hard; 121 to 180 mg/L as hard; and more than 180 mg/L as very hard.

My city water report has us at an average for water samples of 360 with a range of 280-430. So we are off this scale. 180 being very hard would seem very reasonable around here.

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u/EuphoricAnalCucumber Sep 24 '22

My buddy bought a house on a well and the water was 650-700. I was like you're eating a stick of chalk everytime you drink a glass of water. Told him he just needed a softener but he didn't believe me. Installed a huge carbon and one other filter on the mains, uv, carbon, and one other on the sink. He got it down to 250-300 and it still tastes horrible. I bring my own water when I go to his place.

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u/wiggum-wagon Sep 24 '22

a softener just replaces calcium with sodium. it will protect appliances from residue build up, it's not really a solution if you wanna drink the water later.

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u/fishsticks40 Sep 24 '22

Are you in Madison?

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u/Should_be_less Sep 24 '22

I've lived in several places with hard water and this doesn't seem unbelievable to me. When I lived in Munich, Germany I would boil water in a pot on the stove for tea and the whole pot would be coated like this afterwards. I went through a lot of white vinegar!

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u/_rullebrett Sep 24 '22

Landlord: "I don't see the problem. Also, rent's going up"

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u/thugstin Sep 24 '22

Also landlords: "I cant pay my mortgage untill i get your rent."

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u/LatterNeighborhood58 Sep 24 '22

If you're in the US. You can get a tds meter on Amazon for cheap. Get a actual measurement. Most municipalities publish yearly water quality data. Compare your measurement against that and see if it's somehow worse than regular town water. Also most states have minimum standards of drinking water.

Disclaimer: I'm not a pro, just a internet rando and this isn't professional advice.

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u/InquisitiveGamer Sep 24 '22

There are test kits in nearly any hardware stores now days by the water softener/filter section.

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u/silenc3x Sep 24 '22

TDS meter will measure all dissolved solids, but i guess it's a start, The water report tip is a good one. Do this OP. Search "townname water report" on google. See what kinda numbers you're dealing with from the town. If it isn't very high, there may be some other shit afoot.

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u/eugene20 Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

If you're in the US, going on news over the last few years, you shouldn't think twice about getting a load of 16 test in 1 drinking water testing strips (not pool tests).

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u/arthur2-shedsjackson Sep 24 '22

Did you boil the whole pot dry?

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u/ApotheounX Sep 24 '22

Yeah, that is 100% what this looks like. Even with extremely hard water, the "line" of scale on the side starts and stops at the level of water before/after boiling. I've got plenty of pans that do that, and the only time it's ever covered everything is when I boiled a pan dry.

Could also be a dishwasher with heater dry doing this though. Similar process, but it's usually not so uniform.

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u/Bosswashington Sep 24 '22 Silver

This. That is what water with a high lime content looks like when you reduce it 100%

Source: am a recovering alcoholic, and I have high lime content in my water, and had that exact same pot. I have woken up on more than one occasion with this identical issue. Unfortunately, if this happens too many times, that pot becomes trash.

Edit: or they reduced salt water, baking soda water or something similar for karma.

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u/BrolecopterPilot Sep 24 '22

Wait what does being a recovering alcoholic have to do with it? Not making a joke or anything, genuinely don’t know.

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u/Elmodipus Sep 24 '22

Falling asleep drunk while boiling water

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u/EaterOfFood Sep 24 '22

why do alcoholics boil water so often?

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u/CurryMustard Sep 24 '22

Probably for ramen... because they're hungry

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u/limitlessEXP Sep 24 '22

Can confirm.

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u/NiyiyicePants Sep 24 '22

Hot Toddys.

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u/MisfitMishap Sep 24 '22

Also an adhd special trick

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u/ReaganEraEconomics Sep 24 '22

Watch pot never boil, pass out/hyper focus and it boils immediately

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u/suship Sep 24 '22

Gather up enough energy to make coffee then hyperfocus on something until 21:00 when it’s become cold brew.

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u/Hellknightx Sep 24 '22

Had a roommate do this all the time. Eventually kicked him out after the third 3AM kitchen fire.

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u/Toolboxmcgee Sep 24 '22

Thank you for asking, glad to know I'm not the only one who was confused.

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u/Not_A_Gravedigger Sep 24 '22

Hey, there's no need to be confused. When I found out about my water's high lime content, I just had to do something about it. I understand this process can be confusing because the water doesn't appear to be holding any sediments at first, but it happens. As a recovering sex addict, I can attest that warm lime juice will do the trick!

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u/Ripwind Sep 24 '22

Hey, just wanted to say congrats on your recovery! Hope you're well.

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u/Bosswashington Sep 24 '22

Thank you. I am well, as I hope you are.

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u/SelfAwareAsian Sep 24 '22

Good job on the recovery

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u/Bosswashington Sep 24 '22

Thank you for the support.

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u/Wartymcballs Sep 24 '22

You can request a water quality report if you're getting water from a municipality. If not, you can buy test kits.

Get a water softener.

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u/BigfootDynamite Sep 23 '22

She's right, you have Milk instead.

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u/thirdeyefish Sep 24 '22

You don't have hard water, you have a wet mineral source.

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u/Profoundsoup Sep 24 '22

The real mountain springs water

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u/livens Sep 24 '22

Houses don't have hard water, cities do. If your water is like that so is your neighbors and probably everyone in your city (depending on the size).

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u/BravesMaedchen Sep 24 '22

Learning this after moving to a new town with hard water and choking out some of my more finicky house plants with the liquid chalk that comes from my faucet. Have to use a Britta for my plant water (also just ordered a distiller).

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u/opoqo Sep 24 '22

This is harder water

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u/RudeMutant Sep 23 '22

It looks like you were cooking baking soda

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u/angry_1 Sep 24 '22

Ok I am not sure I understand? This isn’t normal? Not being a funny guy either. I’ve gone through water heaters and a dishwasher and that film is even worse when you use the dry feature on your dishes! But that’s fixable?

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u/simplisticwonders Sep 24 '22

This is a sign of hard water, basically minerals left in the water. Water softeners will reduce this if not fix it through a process of ion exchange. If you’re the OP you may need more than a softener, you may need a reverse osmosis unit.
Culligan is a big US brand of home water softening. I have no idea who our competitors are. But you may be able to rent or lease a system to reduce your lump sum.

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u/angry_1 Sep 24 '22

I’m guessing this is what was fattening in my water heater when I took it out?

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u/simplisticwonders Sep 24 '22

I’m decently new to the water treatment world, but yes evidently super hard water will wreck appliances that use it.

We’ve got a mining town about an hour from us and we spend a few days a month there servicing systems. If we can fix orange water from wells in a mine town where they didn’t care about chemical seepage, we can do anything.

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u/polywha Sep 23 '22

That's what my pots look like after I boil water. What is hard water? Is it bad?

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u/Real_Jackraps Sep 24 '22

Hard water is water that has high mineral content. Hard water is formed when water percolates through deposits of limestone, chalk or gypsum, which are largely made up of calcium and magnesium carbonates, bicarbonates and sulfates. Hard drinking water may have moderate health benefits.

On the other hand it absolutely destroys infrastructure. Pipes, Washing machines, hoses, faucets, anything that uses the water gets damaged. It's a big deal.

Look up water softening, that is your homework lol.

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u/MostSharpest Sep 24 '22

Also, kidney stones.

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u/38B0DE Sep 24 '22

That's actually a common myth. There's some correlation between hard water and increased risk but it's not substantial enough to make the claim.

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u/Rough-Tumbleweed-908 Sep 24 '22

Get one of these water quality testing PPM meters: https://www.amazon.com/Accurate-HoneForest-Temperature-0-9990ppm-Aquariums/dp/B073713G5F/

According to the EPA secondary drinking water regulations, 500 ppm is the recommended maximum amount of TDS for your drinking water. Any measurement higher than 1000 ppm is an unsafe level of TDS. If the level exceeds 2000 ppm, then a filtration system may be unable to properly filter TDS

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u/ADG211 Sep 23 '22

This ain't hard water this is some cartel death row water

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u/improbableneighbour Sep 24 '22

Both in Italy and UK you can find the water hardness for your postcode easily online. What country is this?

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u/Mumblix_Grumph Sep 24 '22

That water has more minerals than ASAC Hank Schrader!

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u/noko85 Sep 24 '22

Get a damn tds meter and measure it. Also buy a zero water filter.

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u/gregjet2 Sep 24 '22

Your water has psoriasis

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u/iscapslockon Sep 24 '22

That's dehydrated water. Just add water and it'll become wet again.

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u/AdultishRaktajino Sep 24 '22

A lot of landlords don’t want to deal with water softeners and tenants. They often will let you get a rental unit from Culligan.