r/pics Sep 24 '22 Wholesome 3 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Take My Energy 1 Faith In Humanity Restored 1 Starstruck 1 Timeless Beauty 1 Silver 3 Helpful 4 Gold 1

The Most Mesmerizing Ceiling - Hagia Sophia, Istanbul - Turkiye

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65.4k Upvotes

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u/ThinkBiscuit Sep 24 '22

Did I muck around in the rafters of this place in an Assassins Creed game?

114

u/AsassinProdigyX Sep 25 '22

Time to replay Revelations.

103

u/HotdogsArePate Sep 25 '22 Take My Energy

I feel like this one was very underrated. The setting was amazing.

Such a bummer that the intricate cities littered with historical facts to discover stopped being a thing. Wondering around and getting cool history lessons was my favorite thing about the games in this era.

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u/iamfuturetrunks Sep 25 '22

I feel that to. I replaced 2, Brotherhood, Revelations recently and they are so much fun. Especially with Ezio as a character. And getting to explore cool old places, while also fixing up parts of cities was fun. But yeah the secret tombs missions where you get to explore a church being renovated, or something like that and see the inside from places you wouldn't see in real life while jumping to and from high places was a lot of fun. Then there was Unity (which I got free when that church caught fire) and a year after it originally came out all the patching they did made the game run pretty well with barely any glitches/bugs and it felt like one of the best assassin creed games in a LONG time, especially the parkour apparently was remade really well. But because it bombed so bad (cause they released it without fixing all the bugs/glitches) they decided to scrap that type of assassin creed game and give us the garbage we have been getting lately.

Nowadays they just put in so much crap to pad the game and try and sell you things to make grinding faster. As well as damage sponge enemies and it just seems like the history is no longer a fun part of the games but more like a minor part if at all.

I am not going to hold my breath for the new assassin creed games they featured recently. If after it comes out and looks good like the old ones then maybe, but Ubisoft has burned to many bridges to really trust them anymore.

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u/Blacknife38 Sep 25 '22

I have been replaying Black Flag recently and whilst the cities aren’t too bad, I feel like they pale in comparison of what we’ve previously had. Boston and New York in ACIII were decent although I wasn’t as attracted to the setting. I enjoyed London in AC Syndicate though!

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u/6CenturiesAgo Sep 25 '22

Haha I just wrote down basically the same rant as you did in my comment on this guys comment.

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u/fakeplasticdroid Sep 25 '22

I really liked the concept of the discovery mode they added in AC: Origins. You could parkour around ancient Egypt without any combat or story missions, just exploring, or doing museum-style guided tours of all the famous landmarks and points of interest.

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u/Kruten Sep 25 '22

Not before slamming into the ground and dying several times beforehand.

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u/MisterSlippyFists Sep 24 '22

+3 Faith A free Great Prophet appears. Provides a free Temple in the city in which it is built.

315

u/I_Feel_Blurry Sep 24 '22

A must. If you want the religion victory

147

u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22

Who the hell even goes for that victory

122

u/I_Feel_Blurry Sep 24 '22

Well it’s kinda boring and i hate using so many apostles and stuff but i think it’s the easiest one. My only win on deity was playing as ghandi resulted with religous victory

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u/CX316 Sep 24 '22

My only win on deity was starting as Russia with a 1 turn limit on the game so I won by culture victory after one turn.

I'm not proud of it but it got me the achievement :P

38

u/yippee_that_burns Sep 24 '22

I think I got mine by cheesing out a water map with Polynesia. High seas small islands and starting with ocean travel is bonkers good for expanding

24

u/CX316 Sep 24 '22

"Fuck all y'all landlubbers, the ocean is miiiiiiiine"

11

u/superluke Sep 25 '22

My water/archepelago strategy is with Elizabeth, pushing techs, beelining navigation and getting the Royal Navy out to dominate everything.

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u/jayvil Sep 25 '22

I didn't know you can cheese achievement like that

7

u/CX316 Sep 25 '22

Yeah Russia starts with one extra radius of cultural influence so if the game ends turn one you have highest culture score

93

u/GANDHI-BOT Sep 24 '22

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's needs, but not every man's greed. Just so you know, the correct spelling is Gandhi.

9

u/tenuto40 Sep 24 '22

I think it’s because there’s lot of benefits of starting your own religion and it has a whole other battlefield of its own going while you’re at peace.

In Civ 5, there was no Religious victory (I personally wished Civ 6 and any others would follow that), but it sure as hell was fun completely overwhelming a whole new culture and reaping in all of those benefits!

3

u/sauceeyacoze Sep 25 '22

Aztecs all the way to the deity win because of their basic unit strength and ability to make a builder from any unit killed, but push archery tech first by killing something with slingers, then upgrade all slingers asap to capture the nearest city before they put their walls

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u/TheBirminghamBear Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

I'd actually like it if religious units weren't so exhausting to manage.

That's my biggest problem is you need these units and you need to have a metric fuckton of them and they need to walk across the whole-ass globe and not only convert cities but then engage in holy war with other religious units. Its just way more work for less reward than other strategies. Maybe I'm just lazy tho.

Its clearly never going to be the most efficient or expedient victory option, but especially because you can name and make your own religion, it's really amusing to see "CRAB DICKS BE PRAISED" spread across the entire world as my influence grows and expands.

And in 6 I feel like the Voidsingers created cool alternative possibilities for religion, with occult rituals and shit. I wish they would have taken that concept much further because I'd 100% be here for that.

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u/ahomelessguy25 Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Its clearly never going to be the most efficient or expedient victory option

Not true. My one win on deity involved me getting a religious victory in a 1-on-1 with Kongo, who, if you’ll recall, not only can’t found their own religion but like powers who try to convert them.

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u/ratherenjoysbass Sep 24 '22

Exactly. Best thing religion does is give you free buildings

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u/dickeydamouse Sep 24 '22

And another way to buy land units if you build chancery(?)

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u/ratherenjoysbass Sep 24 '22

Haha yes that too.

I mostly build up religion so I keep my pantheon perks and not have my cities converted by opponents.

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u/BasedAutoJanny Sep 24 '22

Enslaving infidels with peace is quite enjoyable. 🤷‍♂️

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u/vlahonije Sep 25 '22

Smh in Indian, Majan, African, Middle Eastern, Aboriginal and other Indian.... 🥴🥴🥴

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u/Berat0-0 Sep 24 '22

I know this is a reference but where is it from?

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u/--Mutus-Liber-- Sep 24 '22

Civilization...I want to say 4

20

u/MisterSlippyFists Sep 24 '22

Civ 5 mate

3

u/--Mutus-Liber-- Sep 25 '22

I should be ashamed, that's my favorite one

7

u/Berat0-0 Sep 24 '22

Ok thanks

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u/senseofphysics Sep 25 '22

In Civ IV workers build improvements 50% faster. Also +10 culture I believe.

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u/pollackey Sep 25 '22

and +2 Great Engineer points

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u/Adorable_Werewolf_82 Sep 24 '22

I understood that reference!

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u/--Mutus-Liber-- Sep 24 '22

Exactly where my mind went

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u/d64 Sep 24 '22

Alhambra has some fairly stunning ceilings too, even if considerably smaller.

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u/RobotChrist Sep 24 '22

Real Alcazar in Sevilla has the most stunning ceiling imo, they're all absolutely amazing tho

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u/Jump_Yossarian_ Sep 24 '22

I was lucky (smart enough) to do a night tour, it was even more amazing.

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u/FearTheAmish Sep 25 '22

Alhambra and the one in Palermo are two of my favorite worship sites for architecture alone.

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u/MorrowPlotting Sep 24 '22

What is this place? A Christian church? A Muslim mosque? A secular museum? A Muslim mosque?

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u/mistiklest Sep 24 '22 Wholesome Take My Energy

Currently, it is a mosque. It was first built as a Christian church by the Byzantines in ~360 AD. For a period in the 13th century, it was a Latin Christian church, but for most of the time it was a Christian church, it was a Byzantine Christian church. It was converted to a Mosque after the fall of Constantinople, in 1453 AD. At the fall of the Ottoman Empire, it became a museum in 1953 AD. In 2020, it again became a functioning mosque.

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u/KingfisherDays Sep 24 '22

The original from 360 was destroyed in an earthquake, there was another that was destroyed in the famous Nika riots, and the building we have today is from the time of Justinian, in the 530s.

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u/Chartreuseshutters Sep 24 '22

Almost. The original was destroyed in a fire and riots in 404, then burned down again during the Nika revolt in the 532. The 3rd iteration of it was completed in 537, but several earthquakes in the 550s did extensive damage and toppled the dome. The rebuilt and restored it, and that was completed in 562. It’s amazing to think of all of the earthquakes it has survived since. It is a marvel.

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22

the famous Nika riots

You are massively over-estimating the average Redditor.

109

u/ajr901 Sep 24 '22

Hey, fuck you.

But yeah, you’re right. First I’ve heard of the “nika riots”

66

u/SolomonBlack Sep 24 '22

Bunch of soccer chariot hooligans overthrow the emperor.

Nika (victory) was their chant.

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u/SharpenedPigeon Sep 24 '22

*try to overthrow the emperor. Then die.

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u/Icy-Inspection6428 Sep 25 '22

Haha based Belisarius Plebbicus crushing the plebs

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u/MyrddinHS Sep 24 '22

they tried and then like 30 000 people were slaughtered

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u/Empath_ Sep 24 '22

They tried to get the emperor to flee but his wife said “[imperial] Purple makes a fine burial shroud” and shamed them into staying.

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u/Ninja_Bum Sep 25 '22

When were the citizens of Constantinople NOT rioting? That was like their favorite pastime.

Then there was the time they got pissed off when Anastasius embraced the monophysites and modified the Trisagion, the people started rioting and he was all "Okay you guys I'll step down as emperor if you're that unhappy with me" and the crowds were all "Oh. Uh, nah man don't do that, nevermind for now."

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u/CreampieQueef Sep 24 '22

Nika riots, just do it ✔️

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u/Forcecoaster99 Sep 25 '22

Mfs never heard of Belisarius the Based

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u/bstump104 Sep 24 '22

It's basically new!

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u/GoldenFalcon Sep 24 '22

The fall of Constantinople?! Is this why I can't find my date?

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u/reddragon105 Sep 24 '22

If you've a date in Constantinople she'll be waiting in Istanbul.

52

u/angiedoessports Sep 24 '22

Even Old New York was once New Amsterdam

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u/Displacedhome Sep 24 '22

Why they changed it I can’t say.

35

u/ZotesPreceps Sep 24 '22

Maybe they liked it better that way

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u/Kevin_Uxbridge Sep 25 '22

SO ...

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u/Alizerin Sep 25 '22

Take me back to Constantinople…

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u/SpaceWanderer22 Sep 24 '22

Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople?

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u/BigAlternative5 Sep 24 '22

Why did Constantinople get the works?

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u/reeny706 Sep 24 '22

That’s nobody’s business but the Turks.

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u/strange_socks_ Sep 24 '22

Your comment is that other guy's comment, but with extra steps.

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u/rezistence Sep 24 '22

Does this mean it is not visitable as a tourist?

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u/mistiklest Sep 24 '22

When I was in Istanbul, about ten years ago, even small mosques and churches were open for visitors all day. I'd be surprised if Hagia Sophia were not, now.

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u/waitingtodiesoon Sep 25 '22

Yep, just gotta take off your shoes and wear modest clothing to enter. Females were expected to wear a head covering and also cover the shoulders and knees. I went when it was still a museum before it was turned into a mosque and they were doing some renovations inside so there was a bunch of scaffolding put up which did kind of ruin the view a little, but still absolutely gorgeous inside. I did visit other active mosques in the area though and for the most part the people there were very nice.

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u/faceblender Sep 24 '22

Huge tourist attraction

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u/mal_kare Sep 24 '22

Of course it is. Same as all the christian churches throughout Europe. Just at prayer times tourists would not fit in so well.

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22

Imagine having this building and NOT open it for tourists

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u/ariangamer Sep 24 '22

churches in iran are not open to tourists. or just non christians in general. it is a muslim majority country, and churches are rare. i understand if they want to keep a private community for themselves. but i so badly wanna see the inside of a church some day. maybe hear the speaches and see people praying. that would be very interesting.

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u/kindacursed- Sep 25 '22

Well, I've never been even close to Iran, but NONE of them? Not even the major cathedrals?

I get the idea that Christians are a small minority in Iran and most churches must be rather simple and dedicated to the local comunity. But to have not a single church open to visitation in the whole country would be mind boggling to me.

I gave it a try on quick (and superficial tbh) search for cathedrals in Iran: the Vank Cathedral looks quite impressive and it seems that there is even an associated museum on the church complex.

Reviews on TripAdvisor are overwhelmingly positive and one of them even states "Highlight: history/Architecture Worth a visit?? Absolutely yes. Religious restriction: No"

I'd say it seems to be worth a try.

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u/chabybaloo Sep 24 '22

Been to a few churches in the UK. The building style is very different, feels cold. Stained glass can look very nice too. The father/priest is always well spoken, and give good speeches. The younger generation of imams feel more like them. Approachable and well spoken, showing their understanding of Islam rather than just reading out passages.

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u/Background_Novel_619 Sep 24 '22

Wow, it’s amazing to think you’ve never seen the inside of a church, that’s wild to me! Pretty neat to think the internet can connect people from such different walks of life.

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u/_that_random_dude_ Sep 24 '22

When it was a museum, you could have entered in by paying a museum entry fee. Now that since it is a mosque, it is open for public without a fee, even for tourists.

I’m Turkish, and when it was turned into a mosque, the secular and liberal people in Turkey hated the decision because of what it implied. (Erdo trying to Islamize the country and reverting what Atatürk did as a symbolism of the secular republic) But there were also talks about the loss of revenue from the ticket sales would cost several million dollars annually. But even with that they went with the decision of reverting it back to a mosque. I guess it’s good that everyone can see the inside without paying anything but it’s the idea behind the decision is what angers the secular opposition in Turkey. I still hate the decision to this day.

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u/trilobright Sep 24 '22

Have they covered up any of the Christian mosaics or frescoes?

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u/_that_random_dude_ Sep 24 '22

I haven’t personally been to Hagia Sophia for a while so I haven’t seen it with my own eyes, but my quick research revealed to me that apparently they installed “rail-driven curtain mechanisms” in which they cover the Christian motifs during the prayer times (5 times a day) but after the prayer time is over they remove the curtains again for the motifs to be displayed.

Turkish source where I read this

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u/Trailmagic Sep 24 '22

This seems like a very reasonable solution. It’s a quirky result from the history of this building changing hands rather than being destroyed (except for the times it was destroyed and rebuilt).

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u/michaelpinkwayne Sep 24 '22

A lot of the Chirstian iconography was covered after the Ottoman Empire took over in 1453.

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u/scotland42 Sep 24 '22

Some of them have curtains hung in front

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22

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u/Soviet_Canukistan Sep 24 '22

Assassin's Creed: Revelations, play before you go.

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u/Geladrel Sep 25 '22

1933 AD*

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u/ShireHorseRider Sep 25 '22

Christian is Christian… even through the schism the Eastern Orthodox might not acknowledge the Roman pope, but they both believe in the true presence of Christ in the Eucharist.

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u/empathyx Sep 25 '22

In 2020, it again became a functioning mosque.

Fucking Ergdoan, couldn't leave it a museum.

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u/Rdan5112 Sep 25 '22

It’s hard to wrap your head around the age of that place.

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u/tokyoshwift Sep 24 '22

I see what you did there

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u/Seanspeed Sep 24 '22

Glad somebody grasped that they understood what they were talking about already and not actually asking a question.

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u/lawlawerz Sep 24 '22

They also found some Viking etchings on the walls of the Hagia Sophia, presumably written by a member of the Varangian Guard. One of them says "Halfdan was here."

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/viking-runes-at-hagia-sophia

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u/StartledPossum Sep 24 '22

Originally a church, converted into a mosque*

*My memory is garbage, may be wrong.

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u/Astrikal Sep 24 '22

That is correct 👍

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u/dim3tapp Sep 24 '22

All of the above.

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u/eyearu Sep 24 '22

This reads like the intro to that ted-ed video on this

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u/hurtfulproduct Sep 24 '22

Lol, yes. . .

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u/DnANZ Sep 25 '22

A museum and a mosque for 10 minutes (5x a day).

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Surgebuster Sep 24 '22

As wonderful as this photo is, it doesn’t really do justice to the size of it. It was humbling to walk through. To think the building is almost 1500 years old is staggering.

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u/JesterofThings Sep 25 '22

And even at nearly 1500 years old it is still one of the largest mosques in the world and the largest orthodox church in the world. Nothing has surpassed it.

I had the pleasure of seeing it at the beginning of the summer, the entire Sultanahmet plaza ia stunning. My hotel was like a 5 minute walk away and i would go up there every night at 10:30 to have tea and listen to the prayer call. Incredible

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u/Hiseworns Sep 24 '22 Faith In Humanity Restored

It's definitely one of the most amazing pieces of architecture in the world, truly a work of art inside and out

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u/TemporaryValue5755 Sep 24 '22

Thanks to Sid Meier I know what this is

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u/Apollo_the_G0D Sep 24 '22

Michelangelo has entered the chat…

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u/razorbak852 Sep 25 '22

I know! This doesn’t even have any dudes with their dicks out!

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u/NotFleagle Sep 24 '22

Not a religious fight, but St. Peter’s Basilica is awfully amazing too.

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u/Conner14 Sep 24 '22 Beating Heart

Just did a tour of that last week along with the Vatican. I was not prepared for how incredible it was. Honestly more striking to me than the Sistine Chapel.

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u/AmishAvenger Sep 24 '22

It’s so immense, it’s like your brain can’t process it properly.

They had to have Bernini build a giant bronze baldachin just so people would know where the focal point was.

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u/DirtyJdirty Sep 24 '22

To this day, St Peter’s is the most beautiful building I have ever stepped inside of.

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u/scotland42 Sep 24 '22

Remember though, the Hagia Sophia is 1000 years older. St Peter's was built to specifically compete with the Hagia Sophia.

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u/mcdoolz Sep 24 '22

pfft poseurs.

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u/Dasmer Sep 24 '22 Helpful

I mean, they’re both Christian churches. One was just converted to a mosque.

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u/Willing-Philosopher Sep 24 '22

St Peter’s Basilica is like the Grandson of Hagia Sophia. Both churches, but Hagia Sophia was built by the Roman Empire a thousand years earlier.

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u/sneakerpimps85 Sep 24 '22

I’m partial to Sagrada Familia myself but I’ve seen all 3 in person and they are all stunning.

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u/_Claymation_ Sep 24 '22

Was just there, incredible experience https://i.imgur.com/jq2HsVb.jpg

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u/AliCracker Sep 24 '22

Same, that’s the one that I walked away from completely speechless.

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u/Jump_Yossarian_ Sep 24 '22

The Sagrada Familia is amazing but we did a night tour of La Alhambra, my girlfriend was literally weeping because it was so beautiful. Still the most beautiful building I've ever experienced.

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u/dannyproc Sep 24 '22

Also Topkapi palace is beautiful and has the most amazing views of the Bosphorus.

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u/sussyplaya1 Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 25 '22

Checkout Vank Church and Imam Hussein shrine... They're absolutely mesmerizing as well, Persian architecture is massively underrated.

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u/ReadEmNWeepBuddy Sep 24 '22

Yeah Christian Cathedrals are always beautiful.

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u/whoami98 Sep 24 '22

Was just here, so beautiful!

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u/GoodTimeToRollOn Sep 24 '22

AC Revelations 👌

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u/Mau5_matt Sep 24 '22

I remember really struggling on this one

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u/LingonberryPossible6 Sep 24 '22

If you can get to the top in less than 20 seconds you get an achievement

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u/Rarely_Trust Sep 24 '22

Thank you! I scrolled way too far to find someone to mention AC.

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u/MasterKingdomKey Sep 25 '22

Loved climbing this building.

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u/asboans Sep 24 '22

It is completely ridiculous that a building this old is this magnificent, and still basically intact.

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u/Seanspeed Sep 24 '22

and still basically intact.

That's the thing. It's a GIANT building, massively hollow, with a dome and everything, and it's 1500 years old and looks like it could pass as something built just a few hundred years ago.

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u/altahor42 Sep 25 '22

In the 16th century, the Ottomans made a major renovation and repair. If you've paid attention inside the building, you'll notice that most arches are not symmetrical. The Romans built a wonderful building, but over the centuries the weight of the dome became too much. In the 16th century, Sinan The Architect succeeded in spreading the burden of the dome over a wide area by building new structures to support the surroundings of Hagia Sophia.

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u/FearTheAmish Sep 25 '22

Sinan also designed the blue mosque right?

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u/altahor42 Sep 25 '22

No, the Blue Mosque was built by one of Sinan's students. Sinan shaped the Ottoman classical architecture by perfecting the architecture of domed structures like the Hagia Sophia.

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u/FearTheAmish Sep 25 '22

Ahh sorry been watching some videos recently on ottoman architecture. So just have a passing familiarity.

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u/Soundchaser123 Sep 24 '22

According to what I’ve heard, this is one of the most spectacular buildings in the world. To Greeks, it is still the centre of their Orthodox Christianity and will never be forgotten. The story of how Constantinople was lost is fascinating.

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u/Pitiful-Tune3337 Sep 24 '22

Yeah, the Netflix series they made about it is quite interesting

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u/PointyWombat Sep 24 '22

Istanbul is one of the top cities in the world we'll visit again. Such an amazing and historic city.

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u/X_Photo_Travel_X Sep 24 '22

Yeah I visited like 4 times already.. and I just can't get enough

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u/Attila226 Sep 24 '22

Agreed. Out of al of the places that I’ve visited in my life, it was the most memorable.

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u/strangecargo Sep 24 '22

Would go back 100 times. Really amazing place: really amazing people.

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u/TheMotorcycleBoy Sep 24 '22

And +1 gold per turn for all cities with Islam. Nice.

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u/JCarlosCS Sep 24 '22

This should have stayed a museum, but Erdogan likes flirting with Islamic fundamentalism. Ah well.

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u/Dmk5657 Sep 24 '22

Is the new spelling of Turkey actually sticking? Doesn't seem like google maps has updated.

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u/[deleted] Sep 24 '22 edited Oct 11 '22

[deleted]

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u/One-War-3932 Sep 25 '22

If we’re going by native names for nations, can we all start calling Germany Deutschland? I just think it sounds more fun and friendly.

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u/TheSadCheetah Sep 25 '22

Why would it? Nobody is saying Deutschland, Nederlands, Rossiya, Espana, etc

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u/[deleted] Sep 25 '22 edited Oct 11 '22

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u/DoubleD69420 Sep 24 '22

There is a mural under all of that paint on the ceiling that was covered after Constantine died,it will be interesting to see what the x-rays show after extensive research

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u/ghurd Sep 24 '22

Fun fact - this room smells overwhelmingly of feet. Going in the summer time is quite the experience…

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u/actionhanc Sep 24 '22

Turkey eye*

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u/BriefStrange6452 Sep 24 '22

The last time I was there they had a shit tonne of scaffolding up inside, nice to it finally removed!

It is an amazing place and blew me away.

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u/makerofshoes Sep 24 '22

I went just this summer and saw it, it was great. The Blue Mosque on the other hand was under reconstruction and couldn’t really see anything inside, but pictures I’ve seen from there were also amazing

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u/Hippopotamidaes Sep 24 '22

It’s beautiful, but La Sagrada in Barcelona is otherworldly

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u/disillusioned Sep 25 '22

La Sagrada has the extremely rare quality of transporting you to a whole different world. There are so many places that are functionally, at best, as good as their photos. Sagrada Familia is so mesmerizing in its ambition, construction, execution, and sheer imagination that photos can't possibly do it justice. It exceeds its hype. It's truly remarkable and perhaps the most incredible building I've ever been in.

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u/Hippopotamidaes Sep 25 '22

I’ve yet to find something’s picture matching it’s essence in person.

La Sagrada rivals grand, natural and otherwise, spiritual/significantly meaningful experiences.

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u/branzalia Sep 25 '22

I've really got to get back there. I saw it in 1993 and lots has changed in thirty years. I was impressed by what I saw but there were so many cranes on site and the interior wasn't open back then but boy, the current pictures make me want to return. I was doing a round-the-world trip where I was going to get to Europe at some point but covid hit a few months after I started. Some day, some day.

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u/Mutanik Sep 25 '22

Totally agree, looking up at the ceiling in that place feels like looking up into the afterlife.

The best part was the museum where they have a model of what it was going to look like before they got Gaudi and it was just a plain old church.

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u/jesuslovesmen Sep 24 '22

This. Its all subjective but Gaudi was on some shit

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u/TranquilPernil Sep 24 '22

Architectural DMT trip

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u/danidan92 Sep 24 '22 edited Sep 24 '22 Gold

Before the turkish dictator made this amazing building back to a mosque and covered all the christian symbols. Instead of leave it the place which it should be, a symbol of peace between religions.

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u/cleoayssa Sep 24 '22

Fr I was so ashamed when they announced they are going to turn it back into a mosque. This was a place where all religions came together to experience the history, religions and culture of Istanbul. Turning it back was just a fuck you to the west and is shameful. As if they don’t have enough mosques in Istanbul

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u/sahneeis Sep 25 '22

it's mostly a fuck you to greece. even soccer matches are very political when a turkish and a greece club plays against each other calling istanbul konstantinopel to provoke the turks and stuff. and yes one of the biggest mosques in turkey is literally right next to the hagia sophia. it makes zero sense.

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u/Tiger2Normiesi Sep 24 '22

it was pretty good when it was a museum now people eat the fucking door

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u/eddieeddiebakerbaker Sep 24 '22

What does that mean

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u/_that_random_dude_ Sep 24 '22

This is a short summary but it doesn’t really tell the whole story

Basically after it was reverted back to a mosque, bunch of religious idiots ate bits of the fucking door thinking it had holy powers or it would cure diseases or some bullshit. They literally ripped pieces off from the door and ate it

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u/_awake Sep 25 '22

Just woke up, enough Reddit for the day. What the actual fuck, how are people this dense?

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u/CactusDoesStuff Sep 24 '22

they are literally eating the fucking door

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u/coolvibes77 Sep 24 '22

What?

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u/fretit Sep 24 '22

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u/coolvibes77 Sep 24 '22

It says damaged not eaten.

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u/fretit Sep 24 '22

I guess that redditor is trying to be sarcastic. It looks like someone chewed up on the door.

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u/coolvibes77 Sep 24 '22

I'm not gonna lie I could see someone eating a door as being something very real.

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u/_that_random_dude_ Sep 24 '22

Turk here: You’re right, people ripped pieces of the door and quite literally ate bits of it because they thought it had some holy powers. The eating part is not mentioned in the article but when this was revealed “door eating religious zealots” were a hot meme material in Turkey.

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u/precociouschick Sep 24 '22

I wish we could set this in its original form, a Byzantine orthodox Church with stunning gold mosaics all over...

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u/aafa Sep 25 '22

Gotta win Crusade battles first

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u/Icy-Inspection6428 Sep 25 '22

The Romans and the Crusades don't have the best relationship

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u/20person Sep 25 '22

Fuck the Venetians all my homies hate the Venetians

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u/azdcgbjm888 Sep 24 '22

Recently-finished St Sava cathedral in Belgrade has similar gold mosaics.

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u/sneer0101 Sep 24 '22

Istanbul is a beautiful city. Can't wait to go back.

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u/Omega-10 Sep 25 '22

I was going to add this on my comment, but I can't find it. Does Reddit not have a way to look up your own comment history??? I can look up anyone's post history, just not my own gotcha.

Anyway, a brilliant piece by NPR regarding the acoustics of the Hagia Sophia.

https://youtu.be/aELeEpgiQos

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u/ModeThis Sep 25 '22

Didn't they turn it into a mosque now?

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u/damonridesbikes Sep 25 '22

Looks like cover of a Tool album.

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u/dainaron Sep 25 '22

The fact that Muslims couldn’t let it be and made it into such a weird amalgamation is just sad

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u/DocBrutus Sep 24 '22

The Sistine Chapel would like a word.

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u/msegmx Sep 24 '22

the HS was built in the 4th century though.

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u/AdOptimal8854 Sep 24 '22

I respect the sistine chapel's art and craftsmanship, but the raw beauty of the hagia Sophia is the most gorgeous thing I've ever seen. The natural beauty of that much marble in one place! The dome, the arches, the mosaics! The gorgeous patterns on its damn floors!

The sistine chapel is a triumph! We're spoiled to get to have such debates, but I've yet to see a man-made structure that inspired awe like the hagia Sophia.

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