r/worldnews Sep 22 '22 Silver 2 Helpful 4 Wholesome 7 All-Seeing Upvote 2 Take My Energy 1 Take My Power 1

Zelenskyy calls on Russians to 'protest' and 'fight back' against Putin's draft if they 'want to survive' Russia/Ukraine

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231

u/CreideikiVAX Sep 23 '22

Plus no Ukrainian would look at mosin and be like, heck yeah, that's the gun I'll loot.

Hey, WWII bolt-action rifles are cool. Especially if they're in good condi— never mind.

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u/Boxy310 Sep 23 '22

Mosin-Nagants are typically Tsarist military surplus. They were already antiques in WW2, and they're still being dug up from barrels full of Cosmoline.

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u/bingbangbango Sep 23 '22

They are fun as hell to shoot in a non-combat totally just chilling with friends setting

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u/Boxy310 Sep 23 '22

Oh, agreed. In modern combat though I would want something I could shoot more than 10 times without my shoulder turning to jelly, though.

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u/UnnamedStaplesDrone Sep 23 '22

they have that reputation but the limited time i spent with one i was surprised it was very easy to shoot. probably helps that it's heavy. i thought the trigger was surprisingly crisp too.. wonder if someone had modded it.

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u/ses1989 Sep 23 '22

Sounds like you have the full size. I have a full size and carbine, and that carbine will rip your fucking shoulder off worse than hot loaded buckshot, and a muzzle blast to match. Trigger has a long travel time, but it breaks very clean once you get it down. Only issue is how hard they are to cycle unless you maybe had the curved bolt.

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u/GeneralJawbreaker Sep 23 '22

My 91/30 cycles like a dream with brass, but the moment I feed it steel i need a damn mallet to get the bolt open.

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u/ses1989 Sep 23 '22

Maybe that's the problem. I've never run anything other than steel out of it.

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u/gnat_outta_hell Sep 23 '22

The curved bolt was a sniper configuration. If you were running the gun as intended, you would have a small scope in the way making it harder to cycle anyways.

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u/itchynipz Sep 23 '22

Same with G-98’s vs G-98K’s. Oof. Much better in the shoulder then the Mosin’s, but even so I’d much rather shoot the long version. The Germans went to war with a hunting rifle(Mauser). The Americans brought a target rifle (Springfield ’03). The Brit’s brought a rifle for war (Lee-Enfield). The Russians…brought something altogether different.

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u/UnnamedStaplesDrone Sep 23 '22

Yeah haven’t tried a carbine. Sounds fun!

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u/Stinkyclamjuice15 Sep 23 '22

The carbine kicks bad lol

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u/149Murphy Sep 23 '22

I had the same experience. I suppose I was fairly warned, and I have a lot of experience with different weapons so I was expecting a mule kick. It was not so bad.

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u/[deleted] Sep 23 '22

I learned to shoot rifles on one of those when I was a child. Pretty damn accurate, wasn’t too bad on the shoulder, put a scope on it and hit things pretty damn far away and groupings were good.

Though since then I’ve shot a lot more high power rounds and more expensive rifles…still has a place in my heart and I look forward to teaching my son with the same rifle when it becomes more age appropriate.

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u/Collins_Michael Sep 23 '22

The battle rifle is decent to handle, but the carbine configuration pulped me.

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u/hamburders Sep 23 '22

By chance are you a bigger person? I’m 6’3” 220lbs and can throw 100 12ga slugs down range and only feel a tingle in my shoulder at that point. The mosin I have fired felt pretty similar to my .270win which has a decent kick, I just absorb it better than my friends.

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u/UnnamedStaplesDrone Sep 23 '22

Not as big as you, but I felt like a 12 gauge with slugs kicks far worse.

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u/hamburders Sep 23 '22

I suppose it does. The bolt action I think kinda forces a reset on my shoulder more than pump-action or semi, but that’s probably a me issue.

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u/R_M_R_0 Sep 23 '22

everyone here is making the BOLD assumption these hundred+ year old rifles have been serviced since they entered service

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u/GeneralJawbreaker Sep 23 '22

They're stored in cosmoline, so if they were in good shape before going into storage, they're in good shape now. My garbage rod just needed a deep clean to get rid of the cosmoline and can practically hit a quarter at 100 yards. They're definitely not what I'd want in a modern war, but they aren't gonna blow up in your face or have the spread of a shotgun just because they're old

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u/drunkenknight9 Sep 23 '22

The kick is nowhere near as bad as a lot of other bolt action rifles from the time. I have plenty of issues with the Mosin but recoil is not one of them. The carbine sized ones on the other hand...

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u/MadWhiskeyGrin Sep 23 '22

Sometimes you just really need to put a fist sized hole in someone while setting their clothes on fire

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u/MightyPenguin Sep 23 '22

They are heavy guns honestly(more weight means less harsh recoil as the extra mass absorbs it), they dont hurt your shoulder at all. I can fire one for 100 rounds straight and doesnt make my shoulder sore. putting a scope on one would make it a decent long range weapon and they still could be effective.

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u/colewrus Sep 23 '22

A lot of people scoff when I tell then I have a mosin but it's fun to shoot and the ammo was usually in stock through the pandemic. I havent looked since the war so that may not be true anymore

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u/PoetryUpInThisBitch Sep 23 '22

They're fun to shoot, cheap, and accurate.

I was a broke grad student and got invited to go deer hunting with a friend. I reasoned that the Mosin was close enough to a .30-06 to be used for deer, so I found some soft-point ammunition for it, bought one for $70, cleaned it, checked the headspace, and brought it hunting.

Got some good laughs from the guys I was with when I showed up with it.

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u/HermanCainsGhost Sep 23 '22

I suspect in combat they are distinctly less fun as hell to shoot

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u/3PhaseDelta Sep 23 '22

Not to mention they are tough motherfuckers. You could literally throw the thing into a puddle of mud and it'll still fire.

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u/rafikiknowsdeway1 Sep 23 '22

I've heard this a lot. But what makes a gun more fun to shoot than another?

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u/JackPoe Sep 23 '22

Yeah I don't like guns very much but I've always wanted to fire a Mosin Nagant.

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u/Cirias Sep 23 '22

Spot the American 😆

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u/betterwithsambal Sep 23 '22

You just described every single firearm conceived by man. Even a blunderbuss is fun to shoot.

1

u/[deleted] Sep 23 '22

I wish I'd picked some up back when you could get them for $50 a piece in the US.

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u/Abnormal-Normal Sep 23 '22

Wish I got my hands on one 10 years ago when they where like 100 bucks a pop. You and 9 friends could by a pallet of em for like 900 and each get a working bolt gun

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u/KmartQuality Sep 23 '22

"no definition found"
What is cosmoline?

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u/Boxy310 Sep 23 '22

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmoline

It was used by the Tsarist Russian military to store their military surplus weapons, especially the Mosin-Nagant. You fill a barrel with Cosmoline then stuff a bunch of Mosin-Nagants in there, then bury the barrel in the ground so it's not exposed to air. They're still digging up barrels of these, even 130 years after the fact, and the Mosin-Nagants are still in pretty operational condition.

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u/NhlBeerWeed Sep 23 '22

It's like this oil/jelly stuff that the Russians store weapons in to keep it from rusting

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u/subarubob Sep 23 '22

Most of the surplus rifles found in the US are marked from Ishevsk 1940-1945 when I've looked through recently opened crates at gun stores. Tula's are relatively rare (sort of) and pre-1936 rifles with the hex receiver are kinda rare too.

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u/dragonwithagirltatoo Sep 23 '22

Yeah I have a 91/30 from 43. I was kindof under the impression that was pretty common. I mean it was like $150.

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u/HermanCainsGhost Sep 23 '22

Keep going at this rate and maybe they'll need to use arms from the time of Catherine the Great.

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u/otterlyonerus Sep 23 '22

The two main models in circulation are the 91/30, invented in 1891 and updated in 1930, and the M44 carbine, which began circulation in 1944. Both were still in production as late as 1973 according to Wikipedia.

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u/Number6isNo1 Sep 23 '22

Nah, most Mosins are not Tsarist surplus. Many, many Mosin-Nagants were manufactured during WWII. Some even after, including a 1946 Mosin-Nagant M44 (aka a Model 1944) that I own. Most, but obviously not all, of the surplus MNs that were sold in the US in the past 15 years were M91/30s of 1940s manufacture. Even the model number tells you these were not Tsarist surplus: Model 1891/1930 revision aka M91/30. As much as I hate to use an NRA publication for a cite, they do know firearms: https://www.americanrifleman.org/content/a-look-back-at-the-mosin-nagant-91-30/

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u/FactoidFinder Sep 23 '22

Literally the first thing I thought was “holy shit the resell value” had to remember where I was for a minute

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u/GuyDarras Sep 23 '22

Ukrainian picks up a Mosin

Let's see... cracked bolt handle, broken firing pin, worn barrel, weak magazine spring, cracked stock, bent front sight...

Yep, pretty much a standard Mosin-Nagant.

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u/CreideikiVAX Sep 24 '22

It was just fine! Before the HIMARS said hello.

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u/Spidey209 Sep 23 '22

Never fired. Dropped once.